Who Digs the Bard's Digs?

Richard Stanley

Administrator
In addition to identifying Shakespeare’s ‘kitchen’, the dig has also helped establish the size of New Place. This has enabled the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust to commission new evidence-based drawings of New Place, which depict an accurate version of how the house would have looked during Shakespeare’s ownership.

Shakespeare’s New Place was the largest single residence in the borough of Stratford-upon-Avon, and was purchased for the considerable sum of £120 in 1597 (a Stratford school teacher at this time would have earned about £20 per annum). It had an impressive frontage, a Great Chamber and Gallery, over 20 rooms and 10 fireplaces.

Address : <http://www.shakespeare.org.uk/about-us/press-information/news/shakespeare-039-s-kitchen-unearthed.html>

 

Richard Stanley

Administrator
The above post and link are about Shakespeare's sumptuous Stratford dwelling, and this article is about his tony London digs.

The location of William Shakespeare's London home where the playwright wrote "Romeo and Juliet" has been identified for the first time, according to new research.

Theater historian Geoffrey Marsh spent a decade meticulously researching the home of the English dramatist and poet by cross-referencing official records to pinpoint where exactly Shakespeare lived during the 1590s.

Marsh's quest began after The Theatre, an Elizabethan playhouse in East London's Shoreditch, was discovered in 2008. The historian wondered where Shakespeare was living when his plays were performed there, which predated The Globe as the playwright's workplace.

It had previously been identified that the Shakespeare lived in Central London near Liverpool Street Station, then known as the parish of St. Helens, after he was listed on taxpayer records in 1597/98, but the exact location was never identified. ...
 
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