The Flavian Signature - Outside of Jerusalem - How to build a tower (part 2)

gilius

Active Member
OK it seems I've found the correct match for Joe's original parallel occurring just before the Triumphal entrance into Jerusalem:

The tyranny of Simon and John.
248 The combatants in the city, apart from the Idumaeans were, first, Simon's ten thousand rebels who had fifty officers and he was leader of them all. 249 With him were five thousand Idumaeans with ten chiefs, among whom the best known were Jacob, son of Sosas and Simon, son of Cathlas. 250 John, who had seized the temple, had six thousand warriors, under twenty officers, plus the two thousand, four hundred Zealots who had ceased their opposition and come over to him, with the same leaders as before, Eleazar and Simon the son of Arinus. 251 While as we said, these fought each other, the ordinary folk were prey to both and any people who would not join in their crimes were plundered by both sides. 252 Simon held the upper city and the great wall as far as the Cedron and the part of the old wall stretching east from Siloam and down to the palace of Monobazus, who was king of the Adiabeni, beyond the Euphrates. 253 He also held the fountain and the Acra, or lower city, and all as far as the palace of queen Helena, the mother of Monobazus. 254 John held the temple and the areas adjoining it for a long way, and Ophla and the so-called Valley of Cedron. When the areas in between were burned, it left a space for fighting each other, 255 since this strife within did not cease even with the Romans encamped just outside the walls. For a short while they had learned prudence from the first attack of the Romans, but again split up and fought it out and did all that the besiegers could wish. 256 From the Romans they fared no worse than what they did to each other, after which nothing of what the city endured could be considered new, as its worst misery came before its ruin, while those who captured it brought it some relief. 257 Let me say the rebellion destroyed the city and the Romans destroyed the rebellion, which was tougher than the walls, so that our troubles came from our own people and justice from the Romans. But concerning this let every one judge, based on the facts.
JW 5.248-257

258 While this was going on inside the city, Titus went around on the outside with some elite cavalry, looking for a suitable place to make an assault on the walls. 259 He was at a loss, since it was unapproachable along the valleys and on the other side the first wall seemed too strong to be shaken by the machines, but thought it best to make the assault near the tomb of the high priest, John. 260 There the first part of the wall was lower and the second was not joined to it, as the builders neglecting to build it strong as there were not many living in the new city. Here too, there was easy access to the third wall, through which he planned to take the upper city, and, through the Antonia tower, the temple itself. 261 About then, as he was going around, Nicanor, one of his friends, got an arrow in his left shoulder, while approaching too near the wall along with Josephus, trying to talk of peace with the men on the wall to whom he was known. 262 From this Caesar saw their rage, how they would not refrain from people who approached to talk about saving their lives, and was provoked to press on the siege and let his legions set fire to the suburbs, and told them to gather material and raise earthworks. 263 Dividing his army into three parts for this task, he placed in the centre of the earthworks spearmen and archers and in front of them the quick-firers and catapults and stone-throwing machines to prevent sorties by the enemy upon their works and stop the men on the wall from impeding them. 264 So the trees were now cut down and the suburbs left bare. But while the timber was brought to raise the earthworks and the whole army was hard at work, the Jews were not idle. 265 The populace which had been subject to looting and murder now took heart and expected to have a breathing space while the others were busy with their outside foes and that if the Romans were victorious they could see revenge taken on those who had caused all this.
JW 5.258-265

Two Blind Men Receive Their Sight
Now as they went out of Jericho, a great multitude followed Him.30 And behold, two blind men sitting by the road, when they heard that Jesus was passing by, cried out, saying, “Have mercy on us, O Lord, Son of David!”
Then the multitude warned them that they should be quiet; but they cried out all the more, saying, “Have mercy on us, O Lord, Son of David!”
So Jesus stood still and called them, and said, “What do you want Me to do for you?”
They said to Him, “Lord, that our eyes may be opened.” So Jesus had compassion and touched their eyes. And immediately their eyes received sight, and they followed Him.

Matthew 20:29-34

A Blind Man Receives His Sight

Then it happened, as He was coming near Jericho, that a certain blind man sat by the road begging. And hearing a multitude passing by, he asked what it meant. So they told him that Jesus of Nazareth was passing by. And he cried out, saying, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!”
Then those who went before warned him that he should be quiet; but he cried out all the more, “Son of David, have mercy on me!”
So Jesus stood still and commanded him to be brought to Him. And when he had come near, He asked him, saying, “What do you want Me to do for you?”
He said, “Lord, that I may receive my sight.”
Then Jesus said to him, “Receive your sight; your faith has made you well.” And immediately he received his sight, and followed Him, glorifying God. And all the people, when they saw it, gave praise to God.

Luke 18:35-43

Jesus Heals Blind Bartimaeus

Now they came to Jericho. As He went out of Jericho with His disciples and a great multitude, blind Bartimaeus, the son of Timaeus, sat by the road begging. And when he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to cry out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!”
Then many warned him to be quiet; but he cried out all the more, “Son of David, have mercy on me!”
So Jesus stood still and commanded him to be called.
Then they called the blind man, saying to him, “Be of good cheer. Rise, He is calling you.”
And throwing aside his garment, he rose and came to Jesus.
So Jesus answered and said to him, “What do you want Me to do for you?”
The blind man said to Him, “Rabboni, that I may receive my sight.”
Then Jesus said to him, “Go your way; your faith has made you well.”And immediately he received his sight and followed Jesus on the road.

Mark 10:46-52

http://bsesrv214.bse.vt.edu/Grisso/Articles/Bartimaeus.pdf


Then Jesus entered and passed through Jericho. 2 Now behold, there was a man named Zacchaeus who was a chief tax collector, and he was rich. 3 And he sought to see who Jesus was, but could not because of the crowd, for he was of short stature. 4 So he ran ahead and climbed up into a sycamore tree to see Him, for He was going to pass that way.5 And when Jesus came to the place, He looked up and saw him, and said to him, “Zacchaeus, make haste and come down, for today I must stay at your house.” 6 So he made haste and came down, and received Him joyfully. 7 But when they saw it, they all complained, saying, “He has gone to be a guest with a man who is a sinner.”
8 Then Zacchaeus stood and said to the Lord, “Look, Lord, I give half of my goods to the poor; and if I have taken anything from anyone by false accusation, I restore fourfold.”
9 And Jesus said to him, “Today salvation has come to this house, because he also is a son of Abraham; 10 for the Son of Man has come to seek and to save that which was lost.”
Luke 19:1-10 (NKJV)
 
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gilius

Active Member
On second thoughts I think the "Blind Men" might be a red herring, yet the rest of the passages below look a convincing match; however, I am seeing a pattern with Luke 18/19 before the Triumphant Entry: it seems the location could act as a guide beginning at Jericho > near Jerusalem > triumphal entry. Since the gospels' side is based on "passed through Jericho" they might not apply to outside the walls of Jerusalem:

258 While this was going on inside the city, Titus went around on the outside with some elite cavalry, looking for a suitable place to make an assault on the walls. 259 He was at a loss, since it was unapproachable along the valleys and on the other side the first wall seemed too strong to be shaken by the machines, but thought it best to make the assault near the tomb of the high priest, John. 260 There the first part of the wall was lower and the second was not joined to it, as the builders neglecting to build it strong as there were not many living in the new city. Here too, there was easy access to the third wall, through which he planned to take the upper city, and, through the Antonia tower, the temple itself. 261 About then, as he was going around, Nicanor, one of his friends, got an arrow in his left shoulder, while approaching too near the wall along with Josephus, trying to talk of peace with the men on the wall to whom he was known. 262 From this Caesar saw their rage, how they would not refrain from people who approached to talk about saving their lives, and was provoked to press on the siege and let his legions set fire to the suburbs, and told them to gather material and raise earthworks. 263 Dividing his army into three parts for this task, he placed in the centre of the earthworks spearmen and archers and in front of them the quick-firers and catapults and stone-throwing machines to prevent sorties by the enemy upon their works and stop the men on the wall from impeding them. 264 So the trees were now cut down and the suburbs left bare. But while the timber was brought to raise the earthworks and the whole army was hard at work, the Jews were not idle. 265 The populace which had been subject to looting and murder now took heart and expected to have a breathing space while the others were busy with their outside foes and that if the Romans were victorious they could see revenge taken on those who had caused all this.
JW 5.258-265

Then Jesus entered and passed through Jericho. 2 Now behold, there was a man named Zacchaeus who was a chief tax collector, and he was rich. 3 And he sought to see who Jesus was, but could not because of the crowd, for he was of short stature. 4 So he ran ahead and climbed up into a sycamore tree to see Him, for He was going to pass that way.5 And when Jesus came to the place, He looked up and saw him, and said to him, “Zacchaeus, make haste and come down, for today I must stay at your house.” 6 So he made haste and came down, and received Him joyfully. 7 But when they saw it, they all complained, saying, “He has gone to be a guest with a man who is a sinner.”
8 Then Zacchaeus stood and said to the Lord, “Look, Lord, I give half of my goods to the poor; and if I have taken anything from anyone by false accusation, I restore fourfold.”
9 And Jesus said to him, “Today salvation has come to this house, because he also is a son of Abraham; 10 for the Son of Man has come to seek and to save that which was lost.”
Luke 19:1-10 (NKJV)
 
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gilius

Active Member
I seem to recall that "blind men" refer to legions, so it might pair an earlier passage with the legions on the road via Jericho.
 

gilius

Active Member
The build a tower part 2 parallel is still to come - seems I am right about that too - but here's the correct match for the preceding Simon, John and Eleazar one above as discussed on Facebook:

I haven't fully nailed this yet, but having arrived at this parallel by process of elimination through sequencing the gospels and Josephus book 5, it seems we have a half-disclosure on the real king of the Jews, Eleazar, being an alias for Monobazus, i.e. king Izaz Manu IV AKA Immanuel/Ahaz (see Isaiah 7:10) as per Ralph Ellis hypothesis. We also have a new disclosure on James being Eleazar - is this consistent with Robert Eisenman? No wonder he was the brother of Jesus - he's like another Lazarus lampoon! :) Luke 5 says: "also were James and John, the sons of Zebedee, who were partners with Simon", so there you have it... Queen Helena was the mother of John and his brother the main rebel leader of the Jews from Adiabene/Edessa. "Zebedee" could be a word corruption of "Adiabene" (what's the Greek saying?). This might be better than my John "The Baptist" discovery :D (though the oligarchs must already know this)
 
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gilius

Active Member

Mismatched in Caesar's Messiah I've called this "How to build a tower part 2" - actually Titus was looking for a way to get over the walls of Jerusalem to discuss peace terms and bring salvation to their "Holy House". One guy climbs up on a tree to see him - but eventually the trees are cut down leaving the suburbs bare so nobody can impede on the Roman earthworks! Also the legions all took different routes to Jerusalem - some coming via Jericho
 
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