The Flavian Signature - Inside the City - Destruction of the Temple (Doomsday)

gilius

Active Member
This - the principle parallel - is now in sequence, including formerly separate parallels:
*Abomination of Desolation
*Woe Saying Jesus

Joe also missed the best part of this parallel:



"When the rebels fled into the city and the sanctuary and all the buildings round about it were burned, the Romans brought their ensigns to the temple and set them opposite its eastern gate, where they sacrificed to them and with loud shouts of joy acclaimed Titus as emperor."


 

gilius

Active Member
During the beginning of this study I didn't realise - but this is very bad anti-semitism! This is when the temple of Jerusalem was destroyed - so this is the part the Romans really wanted to hit home big time. Before I didn't even know what "Woe to you, blind guides" meant, but now everything is so clear. The Romans don't let out at all... the Flavian psychopaths are in your face here!
 

gilius

Active Member
Could this be the Roman propagandists response to the War Scroll: how the Jews describe themselves beating the Roman army using their own techniques?

Off-topic: does anyone know who the Sons of Aaron, Zadok and Levi were? If the books of Maccabees do not mention sons of Aaron then could they be authored by the Romans as part of the Septuagint? Or did they find the books of Maccabees among the dead sea scrolls? It's hard to know what was held back by the Vatican.

Here's an interesting paragraph I found from the War Scroll:
"Remember the judgement of Nadab and Abihu, sons of Aaron, by whose judgement God showed Himself holy in the eyes of Israel. But Eleazar and Ithamar He confirmed in an everlasting priestly Covenant."
 

gilius

Active Member
Another "sign" based on the Romans modelling themselves on the Babylonians before them:

Note these 6 words in capitals and compare to what I have underlined in red (I haven't bothered underlining DESOLATION - you can see it clearly in yellow/orange) in the subsequent pics:

"'Moreover, I will TAKE from them the voice of joy and the voice of gladness, the voice of the BRIDEGROOM and the voice of the BRIDE, the sound of the MILLSTONES and the light of the LAMP.'This whole land will be a DESOLATION and a horror, and these nations will serve the king of Babylon seventy years." (Jeremiah 25:10-11)



Note in Josephus: a VOICE AGAINST the bridegrooms and brides.
 
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Jerry Russell

Administrator
Staff member
Hi Giles, thanks for the comments. I'm not sure what you're seeing here that would specifically be a reference to the Babylonians?
 

gilius

Active Member
Hi Giles, thanks for the comments. I'm not sure what you're seeing here that would specifically be a reference to the Babylonians?
Jeremiah seems to follow the book of 2 kings in terms of chronicling the the Assyrians and then the Babylonians - particularly during the exile period. Here, Jeremiah is referencing that the Jews are to serve the king of Babylon for 70 years in the 70 year captivity story. Most of these "lyrics" (or rhetoric) are taken from actual Babylonian cuneiform sources that I will later post an example of. When the Romans arrived they are modelling themselves on the Babylonians in leaving Jerusalem desolate and repeating the same acts of "taking" the bridegroom and brides, i.e. ending love and ending the production of bread and food (the mills) and any feelings of goodness in the city - essentially destroying the entire populace and taking captives - including the 10 virgins with their lamps, i.e. the children and younger generations! Essentially they are extinguishing sound and light from what was a bustling city. So with Jesus' Doomsday prophecies, the Flavians specifically wanted us to look up the verse about the 70 year captivity in Jeremiah - since their Roman campaign is a horrific repeat of the Babylonian campaign. If there was any doubt as to whether the gospels or Josephus take primacy then this additional link to Jeremiah should confirm this to be a unified piece of literature. It's really sick humour... two men, two women, taking one of each away in the context of grinding mills and marriage, so all that gets taken away in one fell swoop.
 

Jerry Russell

Administrator
Staff member
Thanks Giles! I'm embarrassed to say that when I read your post the first time, I completely missed that you had brought in a quote from Jeremiah. Skimming too fast. Sorry! But, your more detailed explanation adds a lot of information.
 

gilius

Active Member
The original source for the Jeremiah quote and a lot of this Flavian dark humour is this treaty with the Assyrian king Esarhaddon from about 643 BC:
 
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