The Flavian Signature - Galilee - Keep holy the Sabbath by restoring the "right hand"

gilius

Active Member
For newcomers to Atwill's work, understanding this parallel helps determine who is the Son of Man that Jesus predicted would come within a generation:

Random Noise


True Parallel

OK - let's go through it:

Company vs. guest house, home and hope that you will enjoy our family hospitality
Year vs. few minutes


1) Pic 1: do you acknowledge that in the first paragraph they are talking about a production company, which is different to enjoying somebody's company at a guest house, and that a year is quite different to just a "few minutes" even though they are both units of time?

Sabbath vs. Seventh Day
"Right Hand" vs. "Right Hand"
not lawful vs. unlawful


2) Pic 2: Do you acknowledge that they are specifically talking about the Jewish Sabbath in both paragraphs, i.e.. the seventh day of leave as per Jewish custom? And do you also acknowledge that they are talking specifically about the "Right Hand" (of a person)?

3) Do you acknowledge that "Right Hand" and/or Sabbath/"Seventh Day" would occur at less frequency in general literature than a unit of time? Describing time in whatever unit would, in other words, be a more common occurrence than describing a Jewish custom or only a single hand?

WORD/PHRASE - FREQUENCY
YEAR - 354830
MINUTE - 37929
RIGHT HAND - 4606
SABBATH - 1347
UNLAWFUL - 892
LAWFUL - 827
SEVENTH DAY - 238
NOT LAWFUL - 12

http://corpus.byu.edu/coca/

4) Do you acknowledge that - although the first pic has some merit in terms of the comparisons made - the connections are far weaker than those of the 2nd pic? And the 2nd pic is less likely to be due to coincidence - but more akin to deliberate design?

5) Do you acknowledge that having both "Right Hand" AND Sabbath AND not lawful/unlawful clustered into single paragraphs is more improbable than having just one or two of those matching elements alone?

6) Do you follow that a Jew with a withered right hand came to Jesus in the first story, whom then questioned whether he should be saved on the Sabbath or "destroyed"(?) - paralleled by the story of the Romans wondering the same thing about a whole Jewish city ("destroy" or negotiate surrender on the day of Sabbath?). The Romans chose to offer the security of the Roman Right Hand, forming a satirical joke; the Roman story represents - typologically - the same situation Jesus faced: the Jews are like retarded slaves and then the Romans come along during the Jewish War and offer them protection for surrendering - upheld by the Roman salute that was also used by Hitler. So Josephus is using the gospels story to prefigure the Romans and make themselves look superior for sake of vanity?

7) Who was leading the Romans? Can you figure out from the same passages who the "Son of Man" represents yet? The Son of Man is Lord of the Sabbath in the first paragraph; who controlled the decisions relating to the Sabbath in the 2nd paragraph?
 
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Hi Gilius

Such great questions! Sometimes the words in and of themselves are all we need to know that the works were wired together.

I think your point number 5 above settles the question for an rational person.

Very nice to see such analysis here on the site.

Joe
 
Whomever rendered that illustration of Jesus healing that bad right hand has an interesting agenda- Jesus is draped in the colors of Israel’s flag- He’s hardly swarthy, more northern European, setting himself racially apart from the Hebrews surrounding him- His arms are disproportionately long and his hands are small and feminine- The rest of the figures are properly sized and well rendered- And all male- There’s an air of condescension in the image, as if cosmopolitan Rome was offering these superstitious, xenophobic people a chance to upgrade their culture in exchange for a nominal bit of assimilation and that this Jesus would be Rome’s local go-to guy for Jews wanting to make the transition-
 

Jerry Russell

Administrator
Staff member
I like the color code for illustrating a parallel that's out of sequence.

This is Parallel #3 of thirty-four parallels from Joe's "Flavian Signature" analysis in Caesar's Messiah. We had created an expanded list of 47 parallels for inclusion as an appendix to Shakespeare's Secret Messiah, but somewhere along the line the book was deemed to be too long, and that section was cut. I'm hoping Joe will give a go-ahead to post the expanded list here at Postflaviana, and maybe we can color-code the parallels to make it easier for readers to follow them.
 

gilius

Active Member
I don't know if people generally like my colour-coding or just plain text how Joe did in Caesar's Messiah - the jury is still out on that one.

I've found a few parallels that were actually in sequence depending on the harmonisation of the gospels - though reported out of sequence by Joe. Also, the correct match for Physician heal thyself was about 3 paragraphs away. One parallel may be invalid: cast out the supporters of the son of man or something. Anyway, it's not an exact science - the gospels are clearly wired to Josephus - and Joe's proven the Flavian invention of Christianity 3-5 ways.
 

gilius

Active Member
BTW, in the above parallel, the "picking up of the grain" (from the fields) is actually referenced explicitly, though slightly earlier, in the Josephus chapter when describing the landscape setting for the parallel.
 

lorenhough

Well-Known Member
Whomever rendered that illustration of Jesus healing that bad right hand has an interesting agenda- Jesus is draped in the colors of Israel’s flag- He’s hardly swarthy, more northern European, setting himself racially apart from the Hebrews surrounding him- His arms are disproportionately long and his hands are small and feminine- The rest of the figures are properly sized and well rendered- And all male- There’s an air of condescension in the image, as if cosmopolitan Rome was offering these superstitious, xenophobic people a chance to upgrade their culture in exchange for a nominal bit of assimilation and that this Jesus would be Rome’s local go-to guy for Jews wanting to make the transition-
meet the new boss same as the old boss
The Flavian Signature - Galilee - Physician heal thyself! with the right hand

The Flavian Signature - Galilee - Easier to say "get up and walk" than "your sins are forgiven"
gilius,

 
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lorenhough

Well-Known Member
gilius, post: 1528, member: 25 Nice artistic interpretation and description!


I'm not sure if the Roman salute actually looked like the Roman army pic during the early days - it may have resembled more like Jesus in the above artistic representation and like the hand of Constantine's colossal statue.

http://images.fineartamerica.com/images-medium-large-5/constantine-hand-brian-jannsen.jpg


Augustus of Prima Porta

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_salute

gilius I think you are right, Not a single Roman work of art, be it sculpture, coinage, or painting, displays a salute of this kind show here; Jacques-Louis David's painting The Oath of the Horatii (1784) provided the starting point for the gesture that became later known as the Roman Salute

Early Roman sources and images

Trajan's Column, Plate LXII. Onlookers raise their arms to acclaim the emperor

The modern gesture consists of stiffly extending the right arm frontally and raising it roughly 135 degrees from the body's vertical axis, with the palm of the hand facing down and the fingers stretched out and touching each other. According to common perceptions, this salute was based on an ancient Roman custom. However, this description is unknown in Roman literature and is never mentioned by ancient historians of Rome.

Not a single Roman work of art, be it sculpture, coinage, or painting, displays a salute of this kind.

The gesture of the raised right arm or hand in Roman and other ancient cultures that does exist in surviving literature and art generally had a significantly different function and is never identical with the modern straight-arm salute.

The right hand (Lat. dextera, dextra; Gr. δεξιά - dexia) was commonly used in antiquity as a symbol of pledging trust, friendship or loyalty. For example, Cicero reported that Octavian pledged an oath to Julius Caesar while outstretching his right arm:

"Although that youth [the young Caesar Octavian] is powerful and has told Antony off nicely: yet, after all, we must wait to see the end." But what a speech! He swore his oath with the words: "so may I achieve the honours of my father!", and at the same time he stretched out his right in the direction of his statue.

Sculptures commemorating military victories such as those on the Arch of Titus, the Arch of Constantine, or on the Column of Trajan are the best known examples of raised arms in art from this period.[5] However these monuments do not display a single clear image of the Roman salute. For example, three such scenes have been analyzed on Trajan's Column. On plate 99 (LXII, Scenes LXXXIV-LXXXV), six onlookers have their hand raised to Trajan, half extended straight, half bent at the elbow.

On the ones with straight arms, only one palm is open but held vertically. The fingers of the three with bent arms are pointed downward. On Plate 167 (CII, Scene CXLI), three Dacians extend their right arms toward the emperor, their open hands held vertically and their fingers spread. None of the Romans are returning their gesture.

On plates 122–123 (LXXIV-LXXVI, Scenes CI-CII), the emperor on horseback is greeted by a unit of legionaries. None of the 15 legionaries is raising his entire arm. An officer facing Trajan has his arm close to his body, the lower arm raised, his index finger pointing up, and the other fingers closed. Behind him, two right hands are raised with fingers spread wide. Trajan himself holds his upper right hand close to his body, extending only the lower arm.

The images closest in appearance to a raised arm salute are scenes in Roman sculpture and coins which show an adlocutio, acclamatio, adventus, or profectio. These are occasions when a high-ranking official, such as a general or the Emperor, addresses individuals or a group, often soldiers. Unlike modern custom, in which both the leader and the people he addresses raise their arms, most of these scenes show only the senior official raising his hand. Occasionally it is a sign of greeting or benevolence, but usually it is used as an indication of power. An opposite depiction is the salutatio of a diogmites, a military police officer, who raises his right arm to greet his commander during his adventus on a relief from 2nd-century Ephesus.

An example of a salutational gesture of imperial power can be seen in the statue of Augustus of Prima Porta which follows certain guidelines set out by oratory scholars of his day. In Rhetorica ad Herennium the anonymous author states that the orator "will control himself in the entire frame of his body and in the manly angle of his flanks, with the extension of the arm in the impassioned moments of speech, and by drawing in the arm in relaxed moods". Quintilian states in his Institutio Oratoria:

Experts do not permit the hand to be raised above the level of the eyes or lowered beneath the breast; to such a degree is this true that it is considered a fault to direct the hand above the head or lower it to the lower part of the belly. It may be extended to the left within the limits of the shoulder, but beyond that it is not fitting.
The Tennis Court Oath (1791), by J-L David

On 25 October 1936, Mussolini's personal standard.n Axis was declared between Italy and Germany.
the pope and Mussolini
http://www.larouchepub.com/other/2005/3205_italy_black_prince.html

the aristocratic families of the "black nobility," the Sovereign Military Order of the Knights of Malta, and the heirs of what Pope John Paul I called the "ancients" of Venice.


Mussolini's personal standard. with X boar
 
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gilius

Active Member
Previous Parallel: Demons speak out through humane offering

Moving onto the very next scene/event in both the harmonised gospels and the Jewish war, which is a continuation and with some overlap (using the Whiston translation of the Jewish War this time), and could even be amalgamated with the previous parallel:

Chronology
Titus allows the Jews to celebrate the Sabbath despite the situation as Gischala. (JW 4.94)

Keep holy the Sabbath by restoring the "right hand"
Location:
? / Gischala
Code:
[table][tr][td]Now it happened that He was passing through some grainfields on a [color=blue][b][size=18]Sabbath[/size][/b][/color]; and His disciples were picking the heads of grain, rubbing them in their hands, and eating the grain. But some of the Pharisees said, “Why do you do what is [color=red][b][size=18]not lawful[/size][/b][/color] on the [color=blue][b][size=18]Sabbath?”[/size][/b][/color] And Jesus answering them said, “Have you not even read what David did when he was hungry, he and those who were with him, how he entered the house of God, and took and ate the consecrated bread which is not lawful for any to eat except the priests alone, and gave it to his companions?” And He was saying to them, [color=green][b][size=18]“The Son of Man is Lord of the[/size][/b][/color][color=blue][b][size=18] Sabbath.”[/size][/b][/color] On another [color=blue][b][size=18]Sabbath[/size][/b][/color] He entered the synagogue and was teaching; and there was a man there whose [color=pink][b][size=18]right hand[/size][/b][/color] [color=red][b]was withered[/b][/color]. The scribes and the Pharisees were watching Him closely [color=cyan][b]to see if He healed[/b][/color] on the [color=blue][b][size=18]Sabbath[/size][/b][/color], so that they might find reason to accuse Him. But He knew what they were thinking, and He said to the man with the withered hand, “Get up and come forward!” And he got up and came forward. And Jesus said to them, “I ask you, is it [color=orange][b]lawful to do good or to do harm[/b][/color] on the [color=blue][b][size=18]Sabbath[/size][/b][/color], to [color=purple][b]save a life or to [size=18]destroy[/size] it?”[/b][/color] After looking around at them all, He said to him, “Stretch out your [color=pink][b][size=18]hand!”[/size][/b][/color] And he did so; and his [color=pink][b][size=18]hand[/size][/b][/color] [color=olive][b]was restored[/b][/color]. But they themselves were filled with rage, and discussed together what they might do to Jesus. [b](Luke 6:1-11)[/b][/td][td]Now [color=green][b][size=18]Titus[/size][/b][/color], as he rode out to Gischala, found it would be easy for him to take the city upon the first onset; but knew withal, that if he took it by force, [color=purple][b]the multitude would be [size=18]destroyed[/size] by the soldiers without mercy[/b][/color]. (Now he was already satiated with the shedding of blood, and pitied the major part, who would then perish, without distinction, together with the guilty.) So he was [color=purple][b]rather desirous the city might be surrendered up to him on terms.[/b][/color] Accordingly, when he saw the wall full of those men that were of the [color=red][b]corrupted[/b][/color] party, he said to them, - That he could not but wonder what it was they depended on, when they alone staid to fight the Romans, after every other city was taken by them, especially when they have seen cities much better fortified than theirs is overthrown by a single attack upon them; while as many as have intrusted themselves to the [color=olive][b]security of the Romans'[/b][/color] [color=pink][b][size=18]right hands[/size][/b][/color], [color=olive][b]which he now offers to them[/b][/color], without regarding their former insolence, do enjoy their own possessions in safety; for that while they had hopes of [color=cyan][b]recovering their liberty, they might be pardoned[/b][/color]; but that their continuance still in their opposition, when they saw that to be impossible, was inexcusable; for that if they will not comply with such [color=pink][b]humane offers[/b][/color], and [color=pink][b][size=18]right hands[/size][/b][/color] [color=olive][b]for security[/b][/color], they should have experience of such a war as would spare nobody, and should soon be made sensible that their wall would be but a trifle, when battered by the Roman machines; in depending on which they demonstrate themselves to be the only Galileans that were no better than arrogant slaves and captives. Now none of the populace durst not only make a reply, but durst not so much as get upon the wall, for it was all taken up by the robbers, who were also the guard at the gates, in order to prevent any of the rest from going out, in order to propose terms of submission, and from receiving any of the horsemen into the city. But John returned Titus this answer: That for himself he was content to hearken to his proposals, and that he would either persuade or force those that refused them. Yet he said that [color=green][b][size=18]Titus[/size] ought to have such regard to the Jewish law, as to [size=18]grant them leave to celebrate that day[/size], which was[/b][/color] [color=blue][b][size=18]the seventh day[/size][/b][/color] of the week, on which it was [color=red][b][size=18]unlawful[/size][/b][/color] [color=orange][b]not only to remove their arms, but even to treat of peace also[/b][/color]; and that even the Romans were not ignorant how the period of the [color=blue][b][size=18]seventh day[/size][/b][/color] was among them a cessation from all labors; and that he who should compel them to transgress the law about that day would be equally guilty with those that were compelled to transgress it: and that this delay could be of no disadvantage to him; for why should any body think of doing any thing in the night, unless it was to fly away? which he might prevent by placing his camp round about them; and that they should think it a great point gained, if they might not be obliged to transgress the laws of their country; and that it would be a right thing for him, who designed to grant them peace, without their expectation of such a favor, to preserve the laws of those they saved inviolable. Thus did this man put a trick upon [color=green][b][size=18]Titus[/size][/b][/color], not so much out of regard to the [color=blue][b][size=18]seventh day[/size][/b][/color] as to his own preservation, for he was afraid lest he should be quite deserted if the city should be taken, and had his hopes of life in that night, and in his flight therein. Now this was [color=green][b]the work of God. [/b][/color][b](Jewish War 4, 2, 92-104)[/b][/td][/tr][/table]
 
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gilius

Active Member
Now it happened that He was passing through some grainfields on a Sabbath; and His disciples were picking the heads of grain, rubbing them in their hands, and eating the grain. But some of the Pharisees said, “Why do you do what is not lawful on the Sabbath?” And Jesus answering them said, “Have you not even read what David did when he was hungry, he and those who were with him, how he entered the house of God, and took and ate the consecrated bread which is not lawful for any to eat except the priests alone, and gave it to his companions?” And He was saying to them, “The Son of Man is Lord of the Sabbath.” On another Sabbath He entered the synagogue and was teaching; and there was a man there whose right hand was withered. The scribes and the Pharisees were watching Him closely to see if He healed on the Sabbath, so that they might find reason to accuse Him. But He knew what they were thinking, and He said to the man with the withered hand, “Get up and come forward!” And he got up and came forward. And Jesus said to them, “I ask you, is it lawful to do good or to do harm on the Sabbath, to save a life or to destroy it?” After looking around at them all, He said to him, “Stretch out your hand!” And he did so; and his hand was restored. But they themselves were filled with rage, and discussed together what they might do to Jesus. (Luke 6:1-11)Now Titus, as he rode out to Gischala, found it would be easy for him to take the city upon the first onset; but knew withal, that if he took it by force, the multitude would be destroyed by the soldiers without mercy. (Now he was already satiated with the shedding of blood, and pitied the major part, who would then perish, without distinction, together with the guilty.) So he was rather desirous the city might be surrendered up to him on terms. Accordingly, when he saw the wall full of those men that were of the corrupted party, he said to them, - That he could not but wonder what it was they depended on, when they alone staid to fight the Romans, after every other city was taken by them, especially when they have seen cities much better fortified than theirs is overthrown by a single attack upon them; while as many as have intrusted themselves to the security of the Romans' right hands, which he now offers to them, without regarding their former insolence, do enjoy their own possessions in safety; for that while they had hopes of recovering their liberty, they might be pardoned; but that their continuance still in their opposition, when they saw that to be impossible, was inexcusable; for that if they will not comply with such humane offers, and right hands for security, they should have experience of such a war as would spare nobody, and should soon be made sensible that their wall would be but a trifle, when battered by the Roman machines; in depending on which they demonstrate themselves to be the only Galileans that were no better than arrogant slaves and captives. Now none of the populace durst not only make a reply, but durst not so much as get upon the wall, for it was all taken up by the robbers, who were also the guard at the gates, in order to prevent any of the rest from going out, in order to propose terms of submission, and from receiving any of the horsemen into the city. But John returned Titus this answer: That for himself he was content to hearken to his proposals, and that he would either persuade or force those that refused them. Yet he said that Titus ought to have such regard to the Jewish law, as to grant them leave to celebrate that day, which was the seventh day of the week, on which it was unlawful not only to remove their arms, but even to treat of peace also; and that even the Romans were not ignorant how the period of the seventh day was among them a cessation from all labors; and that he who should compel them to transgress the law about that day would be equally guilty with those that were compelled to transgress it: and that this delay could be of no disadvantage to him; for why should any body think of doing any thing in the night, unless it was to fly away? which he might prevent by placing his camp round about them; and that they should think it a great point gained, if they might not be obliged to transgress the laws of their country; and that it would be a right thing for him, who designed to grant them peace, without their expectation of such a favor, to preserve the laws of those they saved inviolable. Thus did this man put a trick upon Titus, not so much out of regard to the seventh day as to his own preservation, for he was afraid lest he should be quite deserted if the city should be taken, and had his hopes of life in that night, and in his flight therein. Now this was the work of God. (Jewish War 4, 2, 92-104)
Verbatim: Sabbath/Seventh Day; "right hand"; Not lawful/Unlawful; destroy/destroyed
Concept: to see if healed/might be pardoned and recovery of liberty; save a life or destroy/surrender instead of destroy; lawful to do good/peace and removal of armour; restoration/offer of Roman security; "They were generally farmers, devoted to cultivating the fruits of the earth" (JW 4.84)/picking the heads of grain; Son of Man = Titus = Lord of the Sabbath!
Typology/Satire: Most of the above concepts do not need explaining and are self-explanatory. There was a student of Jesus, i.e. a Jew, whose right was withered (or drooping drown) because he was part of John's corrupted party, so the Romans offered them the security of the Romans' right hand - alluding to the salute. Titus allows the Jews to celebrate the Sabbath because he is the Lord of the Sabbath and respects their customs, i.e. he has the power to do so and is calling the shots as per the previous parallel. The Son of Man was present at the earlier sea battle of Galilee where the Jews were killed like fish in water - now he is confirmed to be Titus! And this hypothesis - part of the continued Roman propaganda in larger context - continues to be tested positive in future parallels to come.

Next Parallel: Tolerance of tyre and sidon over galilee
 
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