The Flavian Signature - Galilee - Fear rather than Death

gilius

Active Member
"Cast out Supporters of the Son of Man" seems to be an invalid parallel, so the "cast out" shared verbatim could be coincidence; the Sermon on the Mount seems to be inserted into the gospels with no Jewish War parallels; the parallels resume shortly afterwards:

This occurs in-between "Keep holy the Sabbath by restoring the right hand" (Jewish War 4,92-104 vs. Luke 6:1-11) and "John the Brainwasher" (Jewish War 4, 213-245 vs. Luke 7:18-35), so the verses in-between that are: Jewish War 4, 112-120 and Luke 7:1-10...

 

gilius

Active Member
The above replaces CM#8 "Mercy, the "unburied" that are "happy", and the prophet" in the least obvious "entrance" set of parallels.
 

gilius

Active Member
Previous Parallel: Faith of the Centurion

Chronology

At daybreak Titus came to the wall, to make the agreement. The people opened the gates and came out to him, with their children and wives, shouting joyfully to him as their benefactor who had saved the city from bondage. Titus was annoyed that he was unable to catch and punish John who had escaped the night before, but he had captives and victims enough to satisfy his anger. (JW 4.112-120)

Fear rather than death
Location: ? / Nain
Code:
[table][tr][td]At daybreak [color=olive][b]Titus[/b][/color] came to the wall, to make the agreement. The people opened the [color=brown][b][size=18]gates[/size][/b][/color] and came out to him, with their children and wives, [color=green][b]shouting joyfully to him as their benefactor[/b][/color] who had saved the [color=orange][b][size=18]city[/size][/b][/color] from bondage. They told him of John's flight and implored him to spare them and to come in and punish the rest of the rebels. Without regard to the [color=green][b]prayers of the people[/b][/color], he sent part of his cavalry to pursue John, but they could not overtake him, for he reached Jerusalem before them. They killed six thousand of the women and children who went out with him, but returned and brought with them almost three thousand. Titus was annoyed that he was unable to punish John immediately for tricking him, but he had captives and victims enough to satisfy his anger; so he entered the city amid of [color=green][b]shouts of acclaim[/b][/color]. Then he ordered the soldiers to pull down a portion of the wall as a sign of capture, and curbed the disturbers of the city [color=purple][b]by threats [/b][/color][color=blue][b]rather than by executions[/b][/color], knowing that if he tried to distinguish the guilty from the rest, many innocent people would be accused due to domestic rows and quarrels, and that it was [color=purple][b]better to let a guilty man alone with his [size=18]fears[/size][/b][/color], [color=blue][b]than to kill with him one who did not deserve it.[/b][/color] Such a man, if forgiven, might even learn wisdom from his fear of punishment and be ashamed of his past offenses, while people [color=blue][b]once put to death could never be brought back.[/b][/color] However, he secured the city with a garrison, to restrain the rebels and provide greater security for the people who were peaceably disposed. So all of Galilee was taken, at the cost of great effort to the Romans, training them for their assault on Jerusalem. [b](Wars of the Jews, 4, 112-120)[/b][/td][td]Soon afterwards He went to a city called Nain; and His disciples were going along with Him, accompanied by a large crowd. Now as He approached the [color=brown][b][size=18]gate[/size][/b][/color] of the [color=orange][b][size=18]city[/size][/b][/color], a dead man was being carried out, the only son of his mother, and she was a widow; and a sizeable crowd from the city was with her. When the [color=olive][b]Lord[/b][/color] saw her, He felt compassion for her, and said to her, “Do not weep.” And He came up and touched the coffin; and the bearers came to a halt. And He said, “Young man, I say to you, arise!” [color=blue][b]The dead man sat up and began to speak.[/b][/color] And Jesus gave him back to his mother. [color=purple][b][size=18]Fear[/size] gripped them all[/b][/color], and they began glorifying God, saying, [color=green][b]“A great prophet has arisen among us!” and, “God has visited His people!”[/b][/color] This report concerning Him went out all over Judea and in all the surrounding district. [b](Luke 7:11-17)[/b][/td][/tr][/table]
At daybreak Titus came to the wall, to make the agreement. The people opened the gates and came out to him, with their children and wives, shouting joyfully to him as their benefactor who had saved the city from bondage. They told him of John's flight and implored him to spare them and to come in and punish the rest of the rebels. Without regard to the prayers of the people, he sent part of his cavalry to pursue John, but they could not overtake him, for he reached Jerusalem before them. They killed six thousand of the women and children who went out with him, but returned and brought with them almost three thousand. Titus was annoyed that he was unable to punish John immediately for tricking him, but he had captives and victims enough to satisfy his anger; so he entered the city amid of shouts of acclaim. Then he ordered the soldiers to pull down a portion of the wall as a sign of capture, and curbed the disturbers of the city by threats rather than by executions, knowing that if he tried to distinguish the guilty from the rest, many innocent people would be accused due to domestic rows and quarrels, and that it was better to let a guilty man alone with his fears, than to kill with him one who did not deserve it. Such a man, if forgiven, might even learn wisdom from his fear of punishment and be ashamed of his past offenses, while people once put to death could never be brought back. However, he secured the city with a garrison, to restrain the rebels and provide greater security for the people who were peaceably disposed. So all of Galilee was taken, at the cost of great effort to the Romans, training them for their assault on Jerusalem. (Wars of the Jews, 4, 112-120)Soon afterwards He went to a city called Nain; and His disciples were going along with Him, accompanied by a large crowd. Now as He approached the gate of the city, a dead man was being carried out, the only son of his mother, and she was a widow; and a sizeable crowd from the city was with her. When the Lord saw her, He felt compassion for her, and said to her, “Do not weep.” And He came up and touched the coffin; and the bearers came to a halt. And He said, “Young man, I say to you, arise!” The dead man sat up and began to speak. And Jesus gave him back to his mother. Fear gripped them all, and they began glorifying God, saying, “A great prophet has arisen among us!” and, “God has visited His people!” This report concerning Him went out all over Judea and in all the surrounding district. (Luke 7:11-17)
Verbatim: gate, city, fear.
Concept: heal with fear rather than execute with death; shouts of acclaim towards a benefactor or prophet in the context of prayers and God.
Typology/Satire: A dead Jew of a widow was being carried out near the gates of a city taken by Titus. The Lord told her not to cry as the dead man did not deserve to die, so he healed the man – but everyone was gripped with fear instead; The Romans believe in tricking the Jews with fearful threats rather than with executions. However, was this just to lead the Jews into a false sense of security? We encountered the same situation in an earlier parallel: last time the Jews began “glorifying God” in the gospels it was when they were cruelly executed in the Jewish War. So who got tricked here – Titus or the Jews? “the people were peaceably disposed” – that sounds like they were indeed executed to me as before (see the parallel Easier to say "get up and walk" than "your sins are forgiven"). Martyrdom before Islamic extremism when people became brainwashed into doing it willingly? In the gospels, although the man began to speak, he was perhaps already a dead man.

Next Parallel: John the Brainwasher
 
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