The Flavian Signature - Demons speak out through humane offering

gilius

Active Member
Previous Parallel: Daughters of Jairus/Jacimus

Moving onto the very next scene/event in both the harmonised gospels and the Jewish war:

Chronology
No place in Galilee remained untaken except the small city of Gischala led by John son of Levi. Vespasian sent Titus against them with a thousand cavalry, but withdrew the tenth legion to Scythopolis. He himself returned to Caesarea with the two other legions to let them rest after their long and hard campaign. As he rode towards Gischala, Titus found it would be easy to capture the city at the first attack. (JW 4.84-98)

Demons speak out through humane offering
Location: ? / Gischala
Code:
[table][tr][td]No place in Galilee remained untaken except the small city of Gischala, whose people were eager for peace. They were generally farmers, devoted to cultivating the fruits of the earth, but many vile brigands had crept in among them, and [color=red][b]some of the citizens were infected with the ailment. They were drawn and urged into this rebellion by [/b][/color][color=purple][b]John, the son of Levi[/b][/color], a cunning knave of variable temperament, rash in projecting great things but adept at achieving his ambitions, known by all as fond of war to win authority. The rebels among the Gischalans joined him, so that the people, who seemed ready to send envoys to arrange a surrender, now waited for the coming of the Romans in battle-array. [color=olive][b]Vespasian[/b][/color] sent [color=olive][b]Titus[/b][/color] against them with a thousand cavalry, but withdrew the tenth legion to Scythopolis. He himself returned to Caesarea with the [color=blue][b]two other legions [/b][/color]to let them rest after their long and hard campaign and let the comforts in those cities [color=green][b]prepare them in body and spirit for the struggles to be faced later.[/b][/color] He foresaw much difficulty in taking Jerusalem, as it was the royal city, the capital of the whole nation, and because the refugees from the war in other places had flocked there. Its location was naturally strong and the ramparts built around it gave him not a little anxiety, and he reckoned its resolute and courageous defenders would be hard to subdue, even apart from the walls. So he carefully prepared his soldiers like athletes for a contest. As he rode towards Gischala, [color=olive][b]Titus[/b][/color] found it would be easy to capture the city at the first attack, but also knew that if he took it by force, the people would be killed without mercy by the soldiers. He was already sated with bloodshed, pitying the majority who would die indiscriminately along with the guilty, and would prefer the city to be surrendered to him on terms. When he saw the wall packed with the corrupt rebels, he told them he wondered what hope they had, staying to fight the Romans on their own, seeing they had captured every other city, and that cities better fortified than theirs had been destroyed by a single attack, while those who trusted in the Romans' guarantee, which he now offered to them despite their former insolence, could safely keep their property. The hope of recovering freedom was pardonable, but to continue in an impossible opposition was not. If they would not accept such a [color=pink][b]humane offer[/b][/color] and guarantee of safety, they would get a taste of pitiless armour and find that their wall was only a trifle in face of the Roman machines. If they depended on it they would be the only Galileans to show the arrogance of prisoners. [color=orange][b]None of the people dared to reply[/b][/color], or even to ascend the wall, for it was all taken up by the brigands, who were also on guard at the gates, to prevent any of the others from going out and [color=pink][b]offering terms of surrender[/b][/color] or letting any of the cavalry into the city. [color=purple][b]John[/b][/color] [color=cyan][b]said that for himself he was content to hear his proposals[/b][/color] and that he would persuade or force any who rejected them [b](Wars of the Jews, 4, 84-98)[/b][/td][td]As Jesus went on from there, [color=blue][b]two blind men followed[/b][/color] [color=olive][b]Him[/b][/color], crying out, “Have mercy on us, Son of David!” When He entered the house, the blind men came up to Him, and Jesus said to them, “Do you believe that I am able to do this?” They said to Him, [color=olive][b]“Yes, Lord.”[/b][/color] Then He touched their eyes, saying, [color=green][b]“It shall be done to you according to your faith.” And their eyes were opened.[/b][/color] And Jesus sternly warned them: “See that no one knows about this!” But they went out and spread the news about Him throughout all that land. As they were going out, [color=orange][b]a mute,[/b][/color] [color=red][b]demon-possessed[/b][/color] [color=purple][b]man[/b][/color] was brought to Him. [color=pink][b]After the demon was cast out[/b][/color], [color=orange][b]the mute [/b][/color][color=purple][b]man[/b][/color] [color=cyan][b]spoke[/b][/color]; and the crowds were amazed, and were saying, “Nothing like this has ever been seen in Israel.” But the Pharisees were saying, “He casts out the demons by the ruler of the demons.” [b](Matthew 9:27-34)[/b][/td][/tr][/table]
 

gilius

Active Member
No place in Galilee remained untaken except the small city of Gischala, whose people were eager for peace. They were generally farmers, devoted to cultivating the fruits of the earth, but many vile brigands had crept in among them, and some of the citizens were infected with the ailment. They were drawn and urged into this rebellion by John, the son of Levi, a cunning knave of variable temperament, rash in projecting great things but adept at achieving his ambitions, known by all as fond of war to win authority. The rebels among the Gischalans joined him, so that the people, who seemed ready to send envoys to arrange a surrender, now waited for the coming of the Romans in battle-array. Vespasian sent Titus against them with a thousand cavalry, but withdrew the tenth legion to Scythopolis. He himself returned to Caesarea with the two other legions to let them rest after their long and hard campaign and let the comforts in those cities prepare them in body and spirit for the struggles to be faced later. He foresaw much difficulty in taking Jerusalem, as it was the royal city, the capital of the whole nation, and because the refugees from the war in other places had flocked there. Its location was naturally strong and the ramparts built around it gave him not a little anxiety, and he reckoned its resolute and courageous defenders would be hard to subdue, even apart from the walls. So he carefully prepared his soldiers like athletes for a contest. As he rode towards Gischala, Titus found it would be easy to capture the city at the first attack, but also knew that if he took it by force, the people would be killed without mercy by the soldiers. He was already sated with bloodshed, pitying the majority who would die indiscriminately along with the guilty, and would prefer the city to be surrendered to him on terms. When he saw the wall packed with the corrupt rebels, he told them he wondered what hope they had, staying to fight the Romans on their own, seeing they had captured every other city, and that cities better fortified than theirs had been destroyed by a single attack, while those who trusted in the Romans' guarantee, which he now offered to them despite their former insolence, could safely keep their property. The hope of recovering freedom was pardonable, but to continue in an impossible opposition was not. If they would not accept such a humane offer and guarantee of safety, they would get a taste of pitiless armour and find that their wall was only a trifle in face of the Roman machines. If they depended on it they would be the only Galileans to show the arrogance of prisoners. None of the people dared to reply, or even to ascend the wall, for it was all taken up by the brigands, who were also on guard at the gates, to prevent any of the others from going out and offering terms of surrender or letting any of the cavalry into the city. John said that for himself he was content to hear his proposals and that he would persuade or force any who rejected them (Wars of the Jews, 4, 84-98)As Jesus went on from there, two blind men followed Him, crying out, “Have mercy on us, Son of David!” When He entered the house, the blind men came up to Him, and Jesus said to them, “Do you believe that I am able to do this?” They said to Him, “Yes, Lord.” Then He touched their eyes, saying, “It shall be done to you according to your faith.” And their eyes were opened. And Jesus sternly warned them: “See that no one knows about this!” But they went out and spread the news about Him throughout all that land. As they were going out, a mute, demon-possessed man was brought to Him. After the demon was cast out, the mute man spoke; and the crowds were amazed, and were saying, “Nothing like this has ever been seen in Israel.” But the Pharisees were saying, “He casts out the demons by the ruler of the demons.” (Matthew 9:27-34)
Verbatim: no verbatim except for “two” (but there are at least 5 concepts).
Concept: Titus/Vespasian = Lord; two legions = two blind men (who follow the Lord/Titus); demon-possessed = infected with an ailment for rebellion; prepare in body and spirit = eyes opened by faith; mute = nobody dared to reply; demons cast out = humane offering.
Typology/Satire: One of the main rebel leaders, John, is “demon-possessed” (see previous parallels regarding discussion of this) – causing the rest of the citizens to rebel. Titus is sent to Gischala to deal with John – followed by 2 legions who are initially “blind” to the struggles to be faced later against the Jews – but Titus/Vespasian prepares their legions in body and spirit (and they have faith in their leaders). Their eyes are, figuratively speaking, opened. At the gates of Gischala John and his people do not speak, but after hearing a “humane offer” for terms of surrender John then speaks and is content to hear the Roman proposals, i.e. Titus has the power to cast out demonic Jews by dealing directly with their overlord, John. Titus is the one calling the shots here.

Next parallel: Keep holy the Sabbath by restoring the "right hand"
 
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