That was swell, now I have to beat it

A new day

Member
When I read this in high school, I didn't like it, but irrationally assumed that I just didn't get it. After reading both of these articles my instincts were affirmed. The book is creepy. Mr. Atwill I'm a fan of yours and was intrigued to read your take on this particular government ordered book. I was not disappointed. Here is my two cents worth. This line sums it up.
"She told me I could sleep with her if I wanted to, but I said no, that I’d better beat it, that Mr. Antolini was waiting for me and all."
Sleep with her . . . beat it. It is not even subtle, so now I'm reviewing every line through as though it was clinical hypnosis therapy (CHT) script or NLP persuasion technique. Salinger's use of three different narrative voices is a CHT techique. With this in mind, his quirky second-person voice may be used for imbedded commands. Another CHT technique is to use homonyms for commands. In the above quote, the slang term "beat it" means both to depart or masturbate. Like the old term "swell". No need to belabor. I'd like to recommend to any Postflavianites, a great reference book, the "Handbook of Hypnotic Suggestions and Metaphors" edited by D. Corydon Hammond, Ph.D., W. W. Notrton & Co.
With all that has come to light, I'm sure Salinger's book was in some way connected to the debauching of American and western youth.
 

A new day

Member
Maybe CITR is not exactly government ordered, perhaps I just felt forced to read it! (I was more into Vonnegut and Herman Hesse at that time.) I checked out what was posted on Wikipedia. The book has always been controversial, but I did not read any criticism for Holden and Phoebe's far too close relationship or Freemasonry connection. Perhaps more true educators will take notice.
 
Hi A new day,

Good grief, you are absolutely right. The sentence is perhaps the clearest attack on the subconscious of the reader in the book. I want to congradulate you for spotting it and pointing it out.

I also want to agree with your hope that true educators become aware of the analysis that we are doing on the book and step foward and demand that it be removed from all mandatory reading lists. They should also ask the local school do to a public presentation of the analysis so as to warn parents of the hidden attacks the media directs against their children.

This is critical in that once such analysis is presented, the resulting concern from citizens will lead to an exposure of the entire organization.

Thanks so much,

Joe
 

Jerry Russell

Administrator
Staff member
Also, I happened to check out Corbett Report’s analysis of Catcher, which in turn quoted Stefan Molyneux, who pointed this out: when Antolini pats Holden on the head, look what happens.
I couldn't keep my goddam eyes open, and I fell asleep.

Then something happened. I don't even like to talk about it.

I woke up all of a sudden. I don't know what time it was or anything, but I woke up. I felt something on my head, some guy's hand. Boy, it really scared hell out of me. What it was, it was Mr. Antolini's hand. What he was doing was, he was sitting on the floor right next to the couch, in the dark and all, and he was sort of petting me or patting me on the goddam head. Boy, I'll bet I jumped about a thousand feet.
Holden abruptly departs from Antolini’s apartment, and says on the way out:
Boy, I was shaking like a madman. I was sweating, too. When something perverty like that happens, I start sweating like a bastard. That kind of stuff's happened to me about twenty times since I was a kid. I can't stand it.
Molyneux’ analysis is that Holden’s physiological response, sweating and trembling, along with his statement that “perverty” things like this have happened to him twenty times since he was a kid, indicates that Holden has himself been the victim of frequent sexual abuse, he has a post-traumatic type of response. This is the reason Holden has so much angst, and so many problems with sexuality. Makes sense to me.

https://www.corbettreport.com/the-catcher-in-the-rye-flnwo-05/
 

A new day

Member
Thanks Jerry, great link for this topic! Molyneux is spot on. Gorightly is one of my favorites! I've become obsessed, in a good way, with analyzing this enigmatic book. The scenes are either about Holden's struggle with male aggression, specifically leadership and teamwork (D/S) or his struggle with his sexual expression. In addition it is loaded, with sexual innuendos, double entendres, and homonyms. Also many scenes are "type language" reflections of each other, not to mention the greater "type language" Bernice the blonde didn't like, but Joe Atwill picked up on. Which reminds me, Stradtlaters tennis racket falls on his head. Old Spencer pats his head. Then while dancing with Bernice, Holden wants to kiss the top of her head. Pattern on pattern, I can't help but pull the thread.
 
When I read this in high school, I didn't like it, but irrationally assumed that I just didn't get it. After reading both of these articles my instincts were affirmed. The book is creepy. Mr. Atwill I'm a fan of yours and was intrigued to read your take on this particular government ordered book. I was not disappointed. Here is my two cents worth. This line sums it up.
"She told me I could sleep with her if I wanted to, but I said no, that I’d better beat it, that Mr. Antolini was waiting for me and all."
Sleep with her . . . beat it. It is not even subtle, so now I'm reviewing every line through as though it was clinical hypnosis therapy (CHT) script or NLP persuasion technique. Salinger's use of three different narrative voices is a CHT techique. With this in mind, his quirky second-person voice may be used for imbedded commands. Another CHT technique is to use homonyms for commands. In the above quote, the slang term "beat it" means both to depart or masturbate. Like the old term "swell". No need to belabor. I'd like to recommend to any Postflavianites, a great reference book, the "Handbook of Hypnotic Suggestions and Metaphors" edited by D. Corydon Hammond, Ph.D., W. W. Notrton & Co.
With all that has come to light, I'm sure Salinger's book was in some way connected to the debauching of American and western youth.
I'd better beat it means "I'd better masturbate."
 
Has anyone mentioned the phrase "AND ALL" that Holden used constantly? I'm pushing 75 and have very seldom, if ever, heard that phrase.
 
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