Sept. 29: American football and the 'bend the knee' protests

Jerry Russell

Administrator
Staff member
I'll post the podcast after it's available at the Revolution Radio archive. Meanwhile, here were our 'talking points':

Militarization of football - http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/the-real-problem-the-militarization-of-the-nfl/

War of 1812 - http://theweek.com/articles/473482/americas-invasion-canada-brief-history

Star spangled banner - http://amhistory.si.edu/starspangledbanner/the-lyrics.aspx

Football causes brain damage - http://www.npr.org/2017/07/25/539198429/study-cte-found-in-nearly-all-donated-nfl-player-brains

Demonization and criminalization of protest - http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2017/09/29/pers-s29.html
 

Richard Stanley

Well-Known Member

And where is that band who so vauntingly swore,
That the havoc of war and the battle’s confusion
A home and a Country should leave us no more?
Their blood has wash’d out their foul footstep’s pollution.
No refuge could save the hireling and slave
From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave,

And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

Is this the height of irony? Only in today's cultural (degraded or not?) context. Not in the typical minds of such people - as blacks were indeed not to be invited to the class of the 'free', as they considered them to be ordained by God as the forever enslaved descendants of Canaan, because of the sin of his father Ham (who had witnessed his drunken, naked father, Noah, passed out on the floor).

This is the ludicrous, illogical nature of such Christian volk. If Canaan was really the father of Africa's blacks then this might imply that Noah was black, and then ... ? But then, with God "all things are possible". Indeed, even we chimpigs can fly.

With the election of Judge Roy Moore to the Senate, against the endorsement of even (crypto-globalist) Trump himself, this Southern bowel movement of extreme biblical literalists is feared to gain even more political power and seats. This, especially as Trump wages war against the establishment Republicans. If Moore wants to return to OT principles (stoning to death) against homosexual behavior, will the above verses regarding slavery be restored from being an anachronism?
 

Richard Stanley

Well-Known Member
Good show.

Regarding the Great Society business, one should keep in mind the fact that southern blacks moved to the northern cities and out west during and after WWII because there were good industrial jobs available. However, for various reasons, including 'white flight', many of these jobs moved away from the cities, to the outskirts. Thus leaving large numbers of such immigrants unemployed. In a city like Los Angeles, where the police force was purposely understaffed, it was policy to use thuggish measures against minorities, as it was cheaper than paying more (white) police.

How ironic that today, white snowflakes, mostly too lazy or challenged to get an edikashun, are all up in arms, carrying tiki torches, about losing their jobs to China and Mexico. And then they vote for the ultimate crony capitalist spitball as their savior.

I'll bet those tiki torches weren't made in Fiji either.
 

Diana Lee

New Member
I'll post the podcast after it's available at the Revolution Radio archive. Meanwhile, here were our 'talking points':

Militarization of football - http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/the-real-problem-the-militarization-of-the-nfl/

War of 1812 - http://theweek.com/articles/473482/americas-invasion-canada-brief-history

Star spangled banner - http://amhistory.si.edu/starspangledbanner/the-lyrics.aspx

Football causes brain damage - http://www.npr.org/2017/07/25/539198429/study-cte-found-in-nearly-all-donated-nfl-player-brains

Demonization and criminalization of protest - http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2017/09/29/pers-s29.html
Are Joe and Jerry really aware that they were saying that black players are not smart enough to know what they are doing when they take a knee...and that they are not smart enough to know how to protest the fact that police are murdering approximately 800 black men, women and children every year. Your show struck me as very racist in a way that only whites can do. We whites can be allies but there is no way in hell that we know what it is like to be black in America and for that reason we need to shut up and listen to what they are saying in eloquent interviews and posts. And we whites need to start reading Gerald Horne.
 

Jerry Russell

Administrator
Staff member
Hello Diana, thanks for listening. I am sorry that we came across as insensitive. We do want to be seen as "white allies".

As to our claim that black people are "not smart enough to know what they are doing when they take a knee" -- I can only say in our defense, that we have often complained that white people are not generally smart enough to respond effectively to the oligarchs, either.

I've just finished watching "Game of Thrones" season 7, and the gesture to "bend the knee" is a central motif of the series. It is clearly seen as a gesture of submission, albeit it is the virtuous Queen Daenerys Targaryen who is generally making the demand.

If you're aware of any especially eloquent interviews and posts from black athletes or activists, I would welcome you to post links.

And, thanks for the tip about Gerald Horne. This book looks especially interesting --

The Counter-Revolution of 1776: Slave Resistance and the Origins of the United States of America

http://amzn.to/2ykzFn1

The successful 1776 revolt against British rule in North America has been hailed almost universally as a great step forward for humanity. But the Africans then living in the colonies overwhelmingly sided with the British. In this trailblazing book, Gerald Horne shows that in the prelude to 1776, the abolition of slavery seemed all but inevitable in London, delighting Africans as much as it outraged slaveholders, and sparking the colonial revolt.

Prior to 1776, anti-slavery sentiments were deepening throughout Britain and in the Caribbean, rebellious Africans were in revolt. For European colonists in America, the major threat to their security was a foreign invasion combined with an insurrection of the enslaved. It was a real and threatening possibility that London would impose abolition throughout the colonies—a possibility the founding fathers feared would bring slave rebellions to their shores. To forestall it, they went to war.

The so-called Revolutionary War, Horne writes, was in part a counter-revolution, a conservative movement that the founding fathers fought in order to preserve their right to enslave others. The Counter-Revolution of 1776 brings us to a radical new understanding of the traditional heroic creation myth of the United States.
 

Richard Stanley

Well-Known Member
'Taking a knee' has become a tradition in the military, apparently coming directly from the American football experience, apparently starting around 1960. I was wondering if there could be some linkage to an earlier precedent but, haven't found one so far. Obviously, in the Catholic tradition one 'takes both knees' submissively before Jesus and the Virgin (Isis), some even kneel and kiss the Pope's foot. And one sometimes kneels in submission before a king and queen, but is this ever on one knee? So, in this context, I think it is a legitimate question for Joe and Jerry to raise, though I can clearly see the argument that this is a fairly respectful way to protest injustice - while actually exercising First Amendment rights which Americans have fought for. Apparently, for Trumpistas, the symbols are more important than the substance.

I think we can forgive Diana in that she propably doesn't understand the underlying foundations of Postflaviana, that our central focus is on systemic elite manipulation of everyone else, which includes their pitting races and ethnic groups against each other, ie. 'divide and conquer'. Ironically, we get other people coming here because they like some key element of our focus, i.e the cynical creation of Christianity by the elite Romans and Jews, only to be disappointed that we clearly are not race nationalists, or any other form of racists. Alternately, they get dissappointed because we have abandoned the 'right/left' and other similar wedge paradigms.

With dozens of NFL players "taking a knee" during the national anthem as a form of silent protest, the very phrase "take a knee" has been invested with new significance. "Take a knee" or "take the knee" now expresses solidarity against racial injustice and defiance against Donald Trump's attacks on protesting players. As the phrase dominates the headlines, it's worth taking a look at its history in football and beyond. While The Dictionary of American Slang dates the expression back to the 1990s (as noted by John Kelly on his Mashed Radish blog), I've found examples in football going all the way back to 1960. And while "taking a knee" may have also become a military tradition, the phrase's origin is firmly rooted in football, with a number of interlocking uses.


"Take a knee," to describe getting down on one knee, seems to be influenced by other "take" idioms, such as "take a seat" and "take a break." But when did the knee-taking begin? Plumbing databases of digitized newspapers, I discovered the following 1960 example in an article about the University of South Carolina Gamecocks. The Gamecocks held a Varsity-Alumni game, and during halftime, one of the Alumni players, Albert "King" Dixon Jr., paid tribute to Rex Enright, a longtime coach and athletic director who had died the month before. ...

http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=34671

upload_2017-10-14_12-40-55.jpeg

One of the oddities of the weekend’s uproar over players kneeling during the national anthem as a form of protest is that “taking a knee” is a military tradition, especially in the Army. I’ve heard it used most often as a way of pausing, taking a breather, and stepping back to consider the situation. I’ve also heard it used to mean taking a loose form of security during a pause in a patrol, as in the photo above. ...
http://foreignpolicy.com/2017/09/25/taking-a-knee-an-army-tradition/
 

Richard Stanley

Well-Known Member
http://amzn.to/2ykzFn1

The successful 1776 revolt against British rule in North America has been hailed almost universally as a great step forward for humanity. But the Africans then living in the colonies overwhelmingly sided with the British. In this trailblazing book, Gerald Horne shows that in the prelude to 1776, the abolition of slavery seemed all but inevitable in London, delighting Africans as much as it outraged slaveholders, and sparking the colonial revolt.

Prior to 1776, anti-slavery sentiments were deepening throughout Britain and in the Caribbean, rebellious Africans were in revolt. For European colonists in America, the major threat to their security was a foreign invasion combined with an insurrection of the enslaved. It was a real and threatening possibility that London would impose abolition throughout the colonies—a possibility the founding fathers feared would bring slave rebellions to their shores. To forestall it, they went to war.

The so-called Revolutionary War, Horne writes, was in part a counter-revolution, a conservative movement that the founding fathers fought in order to preserve their right to enslave others. The Counter-Revolution of 1776 brings us to a radical new understanding of the traditional heroic creation myth of the United States.
This indeed it very interesting. However, it also forms a nice supplement to Saussy's contention, in his Ruler's of Evil, that the entire Revolutionary War was a cynical machination from the very get-go. Saussy did not cover this slavery aspect, instead focusing on the bizarre economic (e.g. tax) policies handed down from London that also turned the otherwise happy colonists into revolutionaries. Here, threatening the institution of slavery, seen in many if not most eyes as justified by the Bible, would be just one more economic issue to add to pot of stew.

Ironically(?), it was George II, George III's father, who sponsored the foundation of the so-called 'modern' scientific university system at the University of Gottingen in the 1730's, where its very first scholastic product was the intellectually baseless foundation of the Romantic Movement, where relative racial merit stems organically from genetic origins in certain land qualities (the root of today's white nationalist Blood and Soil claims). So, on the one hand, while the Euro-elites were downplaying overt slavery in the colonies, they were also justifying their desire to exploit the rest of the world through further colonization.

Also ironic, is that this so-called modern university system (yet the paradigm for today) was advertized to be based upon rigorous scientific methodology, and yet the Romantic Movement had no such basis of evidential support -- other than the profitable speculations of it founder, and furthermore it supported emotional 'Feelings' as being superior to all other forms of understanding stemming from a rational basis. Much was at stake from such justification, profits from opium, tea, spices, oil, ...
 

Richard Stanley

Well-Known Member
Just ran across the following which I excerpted:

...
To some, Kaepernick and the players who kneel with him are “unpatriotic,” “ungrateful,” “disrespectful,” “degenerate,” to quote just a few of the descriptions hurled their way. To others, Kaepernick’s act—for which he may have paid dearly, as he is now unsigned—makes him a hero.

What’s going on?

At first glance, research into emotion and nonverbal communication suggests that there is nothing threatening about kneeling. Instead, kneeling is almost always deployed as a sign of deference and respect. We once kneeled before kings and queens and altars; we kneel to ask someone to marry, or at least men did in the old days. We kneel to get down to a child's level; we kneel to beg.

While we can’t know for sure, kneeling probably derives from a core principle in mammalian nonverbal behavior: make the body smaller and look up to show respect, esteem, and deference. This is seen, for example, in dogs and chimps, who reduce their height to show submissiveness. Kneeling can also be a posture of mourning and sadness. It makes the one who kneels more vulnerable. In some situations, kneeling can be seen as a request for protection—which is completely appropriate in Kaepernick’s case, given the motive of his protest.

As sports protests go, taking the knee might not seem nearly as subversive or dangerous as thrusting a black-power fist into the air, as Tommie Smith and John Carlos did during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City. Researchers David Matsumoto and Jess Tracy show that even blind athletes from over 20 countries thrust their arms in the air in triumph after winning, which reveals the deep-seated urge to signal power with that body-expanding gesture. You can also find power in the fist. In the Darwinian sense, the fist is the antithesis of the affiliative, open hand, but when we combine a raised arm with a fist it becomes something more communicative—a rallying cry. It’s a gesture that seeks to bring one group together while warning another away.

None of that should be too surprising. But there is an important point of similarity in the raised black-power fist—which makes bodies bigger—and the bended knee, which makes us smaller. Both Carlos and Smith bowed their heads in Mexico City, in a sign of respect and humility that accompanies their social signal of strength and triumph. That mix of messages makes the black-power salute one of the most famous, complex, effective nonverbal protests in our lifetimes—one that we can see echoed on today’s football field.

Which returns us to the kneel. Kneeling is a sign of reverence, submissiveness, deference—and sometimes mourning and vulnerability. But with a single, graceful act, Kaepernick invested it with a double meaning. He didn’t turn his back as the anthem was played, which would have been a true sign of disrespect. Nor did he rely on the now-conventionalized black-power fist.

Rather, he transformed a collective ritual—the playing of the national anthem—into something somber, a reminder of how far we still have to go to realize the high ideal of equal protection under the law that the flag represents. The athletes who followed him are showing reverence for the song and the flag, but they are simultaneously deviating from cultural norms at the moment their knees hit the grass.

By transforming this ritual, the players woke us up. Our amygdalae activate as soon as our brains spot deviations from routine, social norms, and in-group tendencies. We want to know what’s happening and why. We need to know if the deviation poses a threat to us or our group. This may start to explain why so many Americans reacted with such fear and rage to a few athletes kneeling on the field in the midst of a national ritual.

But there’s a lot more to it than that. ...

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/voices/the-psychology-of-taking-a-knee/
 
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