Puny speculations on the origins of Pontifex and Punt

Richard Stanley

Administrator
In the middle of Ages in Chaos chapter on Hatshepsut's voyage to Punt, equating her to the biblical Queen of Sheba, Velikovsky indulges in a seeming digression on the etymological origin of the word 'pontifex', as well as on the name 'Punt'. The latter is the land to which Egyptians, in the time of Hatshepsut, at least, would sail off to once every 20 years to obtain a supply of certain goods obtainable nowhere else. The whereabouts of the land of Punt has been speculated on as to being anywhere from more southerly in Africa to perhaps even India.

Unknown to Velikovsky, in recent times physical evidence of Hatshepsut's ships and rigging have been discovered stashed away in caves along the coast of the Red Sea. These ships were made to be easily disassembled and hauled over land by donkeys and probably camels as well. In this case, they could be hauled from the Nile to the Red Sea across the shortest distance of desert. As I stated in another post, one of these ships was reconstructed recently, and found to sail very well on the open seas. But, most people have still considered that the ships would only sail to the south from there to reach Punt. Perhaps this is still the case, if there was an older and original land of Punt in such a place as the Indus Valley Culture.

However, Velikovsky made the realization that the story told on the wall murals of Deir el Bahari showing the journey to Punt, and 'God's Land', appear to match the biblical account of the Queen of Sheba's visit to King Solomon (and onto Phoenicia) rather closely. I'll go into that in another thread, as now to look at the curious focus shifted to the word 'pontifex'.

Here most people are familiar with the term 'Pontifex Maximus' being a title for the Roman Catholic pope, and before that the chief religious magistrate of the pagan Romans, including Julius Caesar and Marc Antony. The latter wore a metal cap curiously like the shape of the papal crown, and as well, the pagan one was adorned with a cross, predating Jesus's time. (More comments below the excerpt.)

From Ages in Chaos pp. 132-4:
The obscure origin of the word "pontifex," which means high priest, can be traced here. This question had already been debated before the time of Plutarch, and he quoted the opinions of the authorities without finding any of them satisfactory. One ancient authority regarded "pontifex" as composed of the Latin roots pons, pontis, "a bridge," and facio, "I make." The philological conjecture was: The pontifex was a man who built bridges, or the principal magistrate; the chief of the people, who united in his person civil and religious prerogatives. this explanation is obviously very strained. Another authority thought that the first pontiffs were so called because sacrifices were supposed to have been made on a bridge (faciebant in ponte).1 This explanation is even more strained.

The word "pontiff" is not of Latin origin. It was not derived from pons, but probably from Punt. When it is said that Queen Hatshepsut, after visiting Punt, built a "punt" for the god Amon, this means a sacred place of worship. By erecting a "punt" in Egypt, Queen Hatshepsut also introduced the institution of the high priest, copying the service of the Temple in Jerusalem, built on a Phoenician model.

Solomon's alliance with Hiram, the king of the Phoenicians, explains the strong Phoenician influence in the life of the kingdom of Judah and Israel. This influence is stressed in the Scriptures in the story of the erection of the Temple [central to Freemasonry - rs], built with the help of Hiram, who provided Solomon with building material and with the chief craftsman, a man of Hebrew-Phoenician origin (1 Kings 7:13-14). Also the common expedition to Ophir and the peaceful transfer of territory from the domain of one king to that of the other (1 Kings 9:11) might have brought it about that the whole of Palestine at that time was called Phoenicia.

The name Punt being the origin of the word "pontiff" (pontifex), what is the origin of the name Punt?

In the Scriptures the Phoenicians are called "the men of Sidon and Tyre" or "the men of Hiram"; the name Phoenicia does not appear. "Phoenicians" was the name used by the Greek and Latin authors since Homer.2 Rome waged so-called "Punic Wars" against Carthage, which was built by immigrants from Tyre. [or Ugarit in Velikovsky's revised chronology - rs]

It is believed that the Greek explanation of the word "Phoenicians" as "the red men"3 is but a successful adjustment in the style of folk-etymology, although the travels of the Phoenicians to the Western Hemisphere [Diffusionism - rs] and their contacts with the cultures of the Mayas and Incas were taken into consideration by many scholars who studied pre-Columbian America. The other Greek explanation of the word "Phoenicia" as "the land of palms" is generally rejected.4

Pontus, father of Sidon, was a legendary ancestor of the Phoenicians,5 and their name could have been derivedfrom him, or the name of the mythological ancestor could have been derived from the name of the country.

If Punt was originally the word for Phoenician temples, then it could have been derived from the Hebrew word panot, and in this case the Phoenicians recieved their name from the houses of worship they built.6

Even before the conquest of Joshua the land of Jerusalem was called in Egyptian inscriptions Divine Land, God's Land (toneter). Was Jerusalem a holy place before David conquered it, and even before the arrival of the Israelites under Joshua?

In the Bible there is an allusion to the holiness of Jerusalem in early times and to a sanctuary in that place. When the patriarch Abraham returned from persuing the kings of the north, who had captured his kinsman Lot, "Melchizedek king of Salem [Jerusalem] brought forth bread and wine: and he was the priest of the Most High God" (Genesis 14:18).

The name Divine (or Holy) Land, given to the region of Jerusalem in Egyptian inscriptions of the Old and Middle Kingdoms, casts light upon the religious significance of Jerusalem and Palestine generally in the days before David, even as early as the days when the Israelites were still nomads. Since then and up to the present day they have been called "the Holy City" and "the Holy Land."

The astute reader will by now realize that this mention of David and Solomon in such a context throws a monkey wrench into Jerry's and my current treatment of them, and we'll now have to accommodate that, as well as dealing with Moses differently. In any case, there are a number of things to deal with here, besides merely pondering on the pontifex.

First, Velikovsky brings us back to the curious priest king, Melchizedek, who did slightly more than bring for bread and wine to Abraham, but he blessed Abraham, the royal progenitor of the Hebrews and Ishmaelites. This Abraham is somehow related to Hittites and Amorites, and he and his kin are harboring pagan practices such as human sacrifice. As in Canaan and Ugarit, whether we are dealing with Velikovsky's revised chronology or not, the pagan most high god was El. In fact, the very use of the adjective term 'Most' more than implies that this Most High God had lesser gods subordinate to him, just as was the case for El. And then El ends up being one of the names for the Judaic god. Hmmm

Next we are reminded that the Temple of Solomon must be built using Phoenicians as the skilled workers and done to Phoenician plans. Temples have been found in the Levant very similar to the design described in the Bible. Perhaps most perplexing about the Temple Mount, at least, and even more so at Baalbek's temple in Lebanon, is the size of the monolithic blocks used at the respective bases. In the case of Jerusalem, there are ~300 ton blocks, and in the latter, there are 800+ ton blocks in place. An 1100 ton block was left unused in the Baalbek quarry.

So my questions are, why? Why the massive size of the platforms and blocks? Why not provide the chosen Judeans with a unique design, say slightly different than an industrial strength barbeque pit? Different zeitgeist back then maybe?

Zecharia Sitchin speculated that the only reason for such dimensions were to allow them to operate as space ports for rocket landing and takeoffs. Well, now we have seen that the Vatican is preparing the way for the return of Space Jesus.

But even if that is all too high falooting, we need to continue wondering if Velikovsky's speculation regarding the origin of the term pontifex, has anything to do with our wider assertions that the Judaic / Gentile dialectic is contrived. And is thus just a veil for certain elites to hide behind. And thus such uncomfortable questions as: why would the Pontifex Maximus, Julius Caesar, be a Jewish hero; why would the German Catholic church chose to display the Jewish high priest's ephod (the claimed seamless robe of Jesus) for the celebration of Hitler's election in 1933 in Trier; ...?

Finally, regarding India as being the original Punt, at least, there is an interesting theory, advanced by Gene Matlock, that there was a huge migration out of the Indus Valley civilization when it broke up, apparently from massive catastrophies, as mentioned in the Vedic texts, and as seen on the ground there. During the time of this civilization there was a great deal of contact with Sumeria, and there was an admixture of Semitic and Indic peoples, from which there seems to be evidence of significant roots of the Abramic narrative.





 

lorenhough

Well-Known Member
In the middle of Ages in Chaos chapter on Hatshepsut's voyage to Punt, equating her to the biblical Queen of Sheba, Velikovsky indulges in a seeming digression on the etymological origin of the word 'pontifex', as well as on the name 'Punt'. The latter is the land to which Egyptians, in the time of Hatshepsut, at least, would sail off to once every 20 years to obtain a supply of certain goods obtainable nowhere else. The whereabouts of the land of Punt has been speculated on as to being anywhere from more southerly in Africa to perhaps even India.

Unknown to Velikovsky, in recent times physical evidence of Hatshepsut's ships and rigging have been discovered stashed away in caves along the coast of the Red Sea. These ships were made to be easily disassembled and hauled over land by donkeys and probably camels as well. In this case, they could be hauled from the Nile to the Red Sea across the shortest distance of desert. As I stated in another post, one of these ships was reconstructed recently, and found to sail very well on the open seas. But, most people have still considered that the ships would only sail to the south from there to reach Punt. Perhaps this is still the case, if there was an older and original land of Punt in such a place as the Indus Valley Culture.

However, Velikovsky made the realization that the story told on the wall murals of Deir el Bahari showing the journey to Punt, and 'God's Land', appear to match the biblical account of the Queen of Sheba's visit to King Solomon (and onto Phoenicia) rather closely. I'll go into that in another thread, as now to look at the curious focus shifted to the word 'pontifex'.

Here most people are familiar with the term 'Pontifex Maximus' being a title for the Roman Catholic pope, and before that the chief religious magistrate of the pagan Romans, including Julius Caesar and Marc Antony. The latter wore a metal cap curiously like the shape of the papal crown, and as well, the pagan one was adorned with a cross, predating Jesus's time. (More comments below the excerpt.)

From Ages in Chaos pp. 132-4:
The obscure origin of the word "pontifex," which means high priest, can be traced here. This question had already been debated before the time of Plutarch, and he quoted the opinions of the authorities without finding any of them satisfactory. One ancient authority regarded "pontifex" as composed of the Latin roots pons, pontis, "a bridge," and facio, "I make." The philological conjecture was: The pontifex was a man who built bridges, or the principal magistrate; the chief of the people, who united in his person civil and religious prerogatives. this explanation is obviously very strained. Another authority thought that the first pontiffs were so called because sacrifices were supposed to have been made on a bridge (faciebant in ponte).1 This explanation is even more strained.

The word "pontiff" is not of Latin origin. It was not derived from pons, but probably from Punt. When it is said that Queen Hatshepsut, after visiting Punt, built a "punt" for the god Amon, this means a sacred place of worship. By erecting a "punt" in Egypt, Queen Hatshepsut also introduced the institution of the high priest, copying the service of the Temple in Jerusalem, built on a Phoenician model.

Solomon's alliance with Hiram, the king of the Phoenicians, explains the strong Phoenician influence in the life of the kingdom of Judah and Israel. This influence is stressed in the Scriptures in the story of the erection of the Temple [central to Freemasonry - rs], built with the help of Hiram, who provided Solomon with building material and with the chief craftsman, a man of Hebrew-Phoenician origin (1 Kings 7:13-14). Also the common expedition to Ophir and the peaceful transfer of territory from the domain of one king to that of the other (1 Kings 9:11) might have brought it about that the whole of Palestine at that time was called Phoenicia.

The name Punt being the origin of the word "pontiff" (pontifex), what is the origin of the name Punt?

In the Scriptures the Phoenicians are called "the men of Sidon and Tyre" or "the men of Hiram"; the name Phoenicia does not appear. "Phoenicians" was the name used by the Greek and Latin authors since Homer.2 Rome waged so-called "Punic Wars" against Carthage, which was built by immigrants from Tyre. [or Ugarit in Velikovsky's revised chronology - rs]

It is believed that the Greek explanation of the word "Phoenicians" as "the red men"3 is but a successful adjustment in the style of folk-etymology, although the travels of the Phoenicians to the Western Hemisphere [Diffusionism - rs] and their contacts with the cultures of the Mayas and Incas were taken into consideration by many scholars who studied pre-Columbian America. The other Greek explanation of the word "Phoenicia" as "the land of palms" is generally rejected.4

Pontus, father of Sidon, was a legendary ancestor of the Phoenicians,5 and their name could have been derivedfrom him, or the name of the mythological ancestor could have been derived from the name of the country.

If Punt was originally the word for Phoenician temples, then it could have been derived from the Hebrew word panot, and in this case the Phoenicians recieved their name from the houses of worship they built.6

Even before the conquest of Joshua the land of Jerusalem was called in Egyptian inscriptions Divine Land, God's Land (toneter). Was Jerusalem a holy place before David conquered it, and even before the arrival of the Israelites under Joshua?

In the Bible there is an allusion to the holiness of Jerusalem in early times and to a sanctuary in that place. When the patriarch Abraham returned from persuing the kings of the north, who had captured his kinsman Lot, "Melchizedek king of Salem [Jerusalem] brought forth bread and wine: and he was the priest of the Most High God" (Genesis 14:18).

The name Divine (or Holy) Land, given to the region of Jerusalem in Egyptian inscriptions of the Old and Middle Kingdoms, casts light upon the religious significance of Jerusalem and Palestine generally in the days before David, even as early as the days when the Israelites were still nomads. Since then and up to the present day they have been called "the Holy City" and "the Holy Land."

The astute reader will by now realize that this mention of David and Solomon in such a context throws a monkey wrench into Jerry's and my current treatment of them, and we'll now have to accommodate that, as well as dealing with Moses differently. In any case, there are a number of things to deal with here, besides merely pondering on the pontifex.

First, Velikovsky brings us back to the curious priest king, Melchizedek, who did slightly more than bring for bread and wine to Abraham, but he blessed Abraham, the royal progenitor of the Hebrews and Ishmaelites. This Abraham is somehow related to Hittites and Amorites, and he and his kin are harboring pagan practices such as human





The richest Oligarch families of Greece moved to Rome then Venice and the Venice Venetians name themselves after the "Phoenicians". And the plan of bs. Was the "Phoenicians" blue print profected. After the Discovery of the route around Africa and the New World Then they moved to Holland and then London. With family members moving into Germany and France.
 

Richard Stanley

Administrator
Yes, what you mention generally seems to be the case. Unresolved yet, is the role of certain red-headed peoples, such as claimed by the late Nicholas DeVere, and their relationship to these 'Phoenicians'.

But, I don't know what you mean by "the plan of bs"?
 
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