New potential parallel - Daughters of Jairus/Jacimus

gilius

Active Member
The Jairus story has no confirmed parallel (yet), but it occurs in-between 2 other known parallels:
-The Flavian Signature - Galilee - Easier to say "get up and walk" than "your sins are forgiven" (Matt 9:2-8, Mark 2:1-12, Luke 5:17-26 vs. Jewish War book 3, 532-542)
-The Flavian Signature - Galilee - Keep holy the Sabbath by restoring the "right hand" (Matt 12:1-8, Mark 2:23-28, Luke 6:1-11 vs. Jewish War Book 4, 92-104)
s11.postimg.org/evpexgfhf/righthand.jpg

When we look in-between those 2 parallels we find this story (Matt 9:18-26, Mark 5:22-43, Luke 8:41-56 vs. Jewish War book 4, 70-83):
"070 Titus, who had returned, furious at the losses the Romans had suffered in his absence, took two hundred chosen cavalry and some infantry with him and quietly entered the city. 071 The sentries saw him coming, and shouted and took up arms, and as his entrance was soon known to those inside the city, some took their children and their wives and fled with them weeping and crying to the citadel, while others faced up to Titus and were killed. 072 Any who were unable to escape to the citadel, at a loss what to do, fell to the Roman guards, while the groans of the dying were loudly heard everywhere and blood ran down all the slopes of the city. 073 Then Vespasian came with his whole army to help him against those who had fled to the citadel. 074 This upper part of the city was strewn with rocks and hard to ascend and towered to a vast height, surrounded by sheer drops. 075 The Jews within with their spears and by rolling down large stones on them did much harm to those who were coming up, while they themselves were so high up that the enemy missiles could hardly reach them. 076 But to seal their destruction a demonic storm blew up in their faces which drove the Roman missiles up to them and blew back at them and deflected their own. 077 So violent was the wind that the Jews could not stand upon their parapets, having no firm foothold, nor could they see their attackers. 078 Thus the Romans got up and surrounded them and killed some as they resisted and others as they were surrendering, and the memory of those who died in the first assault whetted their rage against them all. 079 Surrounded on every side and despairing of escape, many threw their children, their wives and themselves down the precipices, into the valley beneath the citadel, which had been hollowed to a great depth. 080 In the event, this made the rage of the Romans appeared milder than the frenzy of those who took their own lives, for the Romans killed only four thousand, while those who threw themselves down were numbered at over five thousand. 081 Nobody escaped except two women, daughters of Philip who was himself the son of an eminent man called Jacimus, a general of king Agrippa's army. 082 They escaped because when the city was taken they lay concealed from the rage of the Romans, for otherwise they spared not even the infants, of many of whom they flung down from the citadel. 083 So was Gamala taken on the twenty third day of the month Hyperberetus, whereas the city had first rebelled on the twenty fourth day of the month Gorpieus."

"When Jesus had again crossed over by boat to the other side of the lake, a large crowd gathered around him while he was by the lake. Then one of the synagogue leaders, named Jairus, came, and when he saw Jesus, he fell at his feet. He pleaded earnestly with him, “My little daughter is dying. Please come and put your hands on her so that she will be healed and live.” So Jesus went with him. A large crowd followed and pressed around him. And a woman was there who had been subject to bleeding for twelve years. She had suffered a great deal under the care of many doctors and had spent all she had, yet instead of getting better she grew worse. When she heard about Jesus, she came up behind him in the crowd and touched his cloak, because she thought, “If I just touch his clothes, I will be healed.” Immediately her bleeding stopped and she felt in her body that she was freed from her suffering. At once Jesus realized that power had gone out from him. He turned around in the crowd and asked, “Who touched my clothes?” “You see the people crowding against you,” his disciples answered, “and yet you can ask, ‘Who touched me?’ ”
But Jesus kept looking around to see who had done it. Then the woman, knowing what had happened to her, came and fell at his feet and, trembling with fear, told him the whole truth. He said to her, “Daughter, your faith has healed you. Go in peace and be freed from your suffering.”
While Jesus was still speaking, some people came from the house of Jairus, the synagogue leader. “Your daughter is dead,” they said. “Why bother the teacher anymore?” Overhearing what they said, Jesus told him, “Don’t be afraid; just believe.” He did not let anyone follow him except Peter, James and John the brother of James. When they came to the home of the synagogue leader, Jesus saw a commotion, with people crying and wailing loudly. He went in and said to them, “Why all this commotion and wailing? The child is not dead but asleep.” But they laughed at him. After he put them all out, he took the child’s father and mother and the disciples who were with him, and went in where the child was. He took her by the hand and said to her, “Talitha koum!” (which means “Little girl, I say to you, get up!”). Immediately the girl stood up and began to walk around (she was twelve years old). At this they were completely astonished. He gave strict orders not to let anyone know about this, and told them to give her something to eat."
 

gilius

Active Member
I have highlighted the parts which will become important in a minute. Now let's look at this passage from 2 Kings 4:25-35:

"So she set out and came to the man of God at Mount Carmel. When he saw her in the distance, the man of God said to his servant Gehazi, “Look! There’s the Shunammite! Run to meet her and ask her, ‘Are you all right? Is your husband all right? Is your child all right?’”
“Everything is all right,” she said. When she reached the man of God at the mountain, she took hold of his feet. Gehazi came over to push her away, but the man of God said, “Leave her alone! She is in bitter distress, but the Lord has hidden it from me and has not told me why.” “Did I ask you for a son, my lord?” she said. “Didn’t I tell you, ‘Don’t raise my hopes’?”
Elisha said to Gehazi, “Tuck your cloak into your belt, take my staff in your hand and run. Don’t greet anyone you meet, and if anyone greets you, do not answer. Lay my staff on the boy’s face.” But the child’s mother said, “As surely as the Lord lives and as you live, I will not leave you.” So he got up and followed her. Gehazi went on ahead and laid the staff on the boy’s face, but there was no sound or response. So Gehazi went back to meet Elisha and told him, “The boy has not awakened.” When Elisha reached the house, there was the boy lying dead on his couch. He went in, shut the door on the two of them and prayed to the Lord. Then he got on the bed and lay on the boy, mouth to mouth, eyes to eyes, hands to hands. As he stretched himself out on him, the boy’s body grew warm. Elisha turned away and walked back and forth in the room and then got on the bed and stretched out on him once more. The boy sneezed seven times and opened his eyes."


Both stories, Jesus and Elisha share curiously similar elements, the parent falling at the prophet's feet, continuing on even after a messenger has told them that the child is dead, demanding privacy before healing the child and taking the child by the hand. Furthermore there are linguistic devices which indicate that the author of Mark's gospel was deliberately borrowing from the story of Elisha. The father in the first story is Jairus whose name comes from the Hebrew yair meaning awaken. Later in the story Jesus commands the young girl to awaken or egeire in Greek. In the Septuagint version of the Old Testament story Elisha is told that the boy had not yet awakened or egerthe (past tense of egeire). Mark seems to be using a linguistic tip of the hat to the story of Elisha in his narrative.
 

gilius

Active Member
Some other gospel translations/variations have different details:
43 Now a woman, having a flow of blood for twelve years

47 Now when the woman saw that she was not hidden, she came trembling; and falling down before Him, she declared to Him in the presence of all the people the reason she had touched Him and how she was healed immediately.
 

Jerry Russell

Administrator
Staff member
Hi Gilius,

Welcome back, and thanks for your contribution! I have little to add, other than to say that this parallel looks valid to me, and should add to the statistical power of the analysis.
 

gilius

Active Member
Previous Parallel: Broken through lack of food and other essentials

Moving onto the very next chunk in the gospels following the previous story as well as the very next event in the Jewish War – the conclusion of the battle of Gamala…

Chronology
23-Oct: Fall of Gamala: The Jews of Gamala witheld the siege until a tower collapsed. Titus, who had returned, furious at the losses the Romans had suffered in his absence, took two hundred chosen cavalry and some infantry with him and quietly entered the city. Many faced up to Titus and were killed. Blood ran down the slopes of the city. Vespasian joined his son in battle. The Romans managed to reach the Jews up high and many fell to their deaths. Two daughters escaped because they lay concealed from the rage of the Romans. (JW 4.62-83)

Daughters of Jairus/Jacimus
Location:
? / Gamala
Code:
[table][tr][td]It happened, when Jesus returned, that the multitude welcomed him, for they were all waiting for him. Behold, there came a man named [color=cyan][b][size=18]Jairus[/size],[/b][/color] [color=blue][b]and he was a ruler of the synagogue.[/b][/color] He fell down at Jesus' feet, and begged him to come into his house, for he had an only [color=green][b][size=18]daughter[/size],[/b][/color] about twelve years of age, and she was [color=orange][b][size=18]dying[/size].[/b][/color] But as he went, [color=olive][b]the multitudes pressed against him. [/b][/color][color=red][b]A woman who had a [size=18]flow of blood[/size] for twelve years,[/b][/color] who had spent all her living on physicians, and could not be healed by any, came behind him, and [color=darkred][b]touched the fringe of his cloak,[/b][/color] and [color=darkred][b]immediately the [size=18]flow of her blood stopped.[/size][/b][/color] Jesus said, [color=darkred][b]"Who touched me?"[/b][/color] When all denied it, Peter and those with him said, [color=olive][b]"Master, the multitudes press and jostle you,[/b][/color] and you say, 'Who touched me?'" But Jesus said, "Someone did touch me, [color=darkred][b]for I perceived that power has gone out of me."[/b][/color] [color=pink][b]When the woman saw that she was not [size=18]hidden[/size][/b][/color], she came trembling, and falling down before him declared to him in the presence of all the people the reason why she had touched him, and how she was healed immediately. He said to her, [color=pink][b]"Daughter, cheer up. Your faith has made you well. Go in peace."[/b][/color] While he still spoke, [color=blue][b]one from the ruler of the synagogue's house[/b][/color] came, saying to him, "Your [color=green][b][size=18]daughter[/size][/b][/color] is dead. Don't trouble the Teacher." But Jesus hearing it, answered him, "Don't be afraid. Only believe, and she will be healed." When he came to the house, he didn't allow anyone to enter in, except Peter, John, James, the father of the child, and her mother. All were [color=brown][b][size=18]weeping[/size] and mourning her[/b][/color], but he said, "Don't weep. [color=pink][b]She isn't dead, but sleeping."[/b][/color] They were ridiculing him, knowing that she was dead. But he put them all outside, and taking her by the hand, he called, saying, [color=pink][b]"Child, arise!" Her spirit returned, and she rose up immediately.[/b][/color] He commanded that something be given to her to eat. Her parents were amazed, but he commanded them to tell no one what had been done. [b](Luke 8:41-56 = Mark 5:22-43 = Matt 9:18-26)[/b][/td][td]Titus, who had returned, furious at the losses the Romans had suffered in his absence, took two hundred chosen cavalry and some infantry with him and quietly entered the city. The sentries saw him coming, and shouted and took up arms, and as [color=olive][b]his entrance was soon known to those inside the city,[/b][/color] some took their children and their wives and fled with them [color=brown][b][size=18]weeping[/size] and crying[/b][/color] to the citadel, while [color=olive][b]others faced up to Titus[/b][/color] and were [color=darkred][b][size=18]killed[/size].[/b][/color] Any who were unable to escape to the citadel, at a loss what to do, fell to the Roman guards, while the groans of the [color=orange][b][size=18]dying[/size][/b][/color] were loudly heard everywhere and [color=red][b][size=18]blood ran down[/size] all the slopes of the city.[/b][/color] Then Vespasian came with his whole army to help him against those who had fled to the citadel. This upper part of the city was strewn with rocks and hard to ascend and towered to a vast height, surrounded by sheer drops. The Jews within with their spears and by rolling down large stones on them did much harm to those who were coming up, while they themselves were so high up that the enemy missiles could hardly reach them. [color=darkred][b]But to seal their destruction a demonic storm blew up in their faces which drove the Roman missiles up to them and blew back at them and deflected their own. So violent was the wind[/b][/color] that the Jews could not stand upon their parapets, having no firm foothold, nor could they see their attackers. [color=darkred][b]Thus the Romans got up and surrounded them and [size=18]killed[/size] some as they resisted and others as they were surrendering,[/b][/color] and the memory of those who died in the first assault whetted their rage against them all. Surrounded on every side and despairing of escape, many threw their children, their wives and themselves down the precipices, into the valley beneath the citadel, which had been hollowed to a great depth. In the event, this made the rage of the Romans appeared milder than the frenzy of those who took their own lives, for the Romans killed only four thousand, while those who threw themselves down were numbered at over five thousand. Nobody escaped except [color=green][b][size=18]two[/size][/b][/color] women, [color=green][b][size=18]daughters[/size][/b][/color] of Philip who was himself the [color=blue][b]son of an eminent man called[/b][/color] [color=cyan][b][size=18]Jacimus[/size][/b][/color], a general of king Agrippa's army. [color=pink][b]They escaped because when the city was taken they lay [size=18]concealed[/size] from the rage of the Romans[/b][/color], for otherwise they spared not even the infants, of many of whom they flung down from the citadel. [b](Wars of the Jews 4, 70-83)[/b][/td][/tr][/table]
 

gilius

Active Member
It happened, when Jesus returned, that the multitude welcomed him, for they were all waiting for him. Behold, there came a man named Jairus, and he was a ruler of the synagogue. He fell down at Jesus' feet, and begged him to come into his house, for he had an only daughter, about twelve years of age, and she was dying. But as he went, the multitudes pressed against him. A woman who had a flow of blood for twelve years, who had spent all her living on physicians, and could not be healed by any, came behind him, and touched the fringe of his cloak, and immediately the flow of her blood stopped. Jesus said, "Who touched me?" When all denied it, Peter and those with him said, "Master, the multitudes press and jostle you, and you say, 'Who touched me?'" But Jesus said, "Someone did touch me, for I perceived that power has gone out of me." When the woman saw that she was not hidden, she came trembling, and falling down before him declared to him in the presence of all the people the reason why she had touched him, and how she was healed immediately. He said to her, "Daughter, cheer up. Your faith has made you well. Go in peace." While he still spoke, one from the ruler of the synagogue's house came, saying to him, "Your daughter is dead. Don't trouble the Teacher." But Jesus hearing it, answered him, "Don't be afraid. Only believe, and she will be healed." When he came to the house, he didn't allow anyone to enter in, except Peter, John, James, the father of the child, and her mother. All were weeping and mourning her, but he said, "Don't weep. She isn't dead, but sleeping." They were ridiculing him, knowing that she was dead. But he put them all outside, and taking her by the hand, he called, saying, "Child, arise!" Her spirit returned, and she rose up immediately. He commanded that something be given to her to eat. Her parents were amazed, but he commanded them to tell no one what had been done. (Luke 8:41-56 = Mark 5:22-43 = Matt 9:18-26)Titus, who had returned, furious at the losses the Romans had suffered in his absence, took two hundred chosen cavalry and some infantry with him and quietly entered the city. The sentries saw him coming, and shouted and took up arms, and as his entrance was soon known to those inside the city, some took their children and their wives and fled with them weeping and crying to the citadel, while others faced up to Titus and were killed. Any who were unable to escape to the citadel, at a loss what to do, fell to the Roman guards, while the groans of the dying were loudly heard everywhere and blood ran down all the slopes of the city. Then Vespasian came with his whole army to help him against those who had fled to the citadel. This upper part of the city was strewn with rocks and hard to ascend and towered to a vast height, surrounded by sheer drops. The Jews within with their spears and by rolling down large stones on them did much harm to those who were coming up, while they themselves were so high up that the enemy missiles could hardly reach them. But to seal their destruction a demonic storm blew up in their faces which drove the Roman missiles up to them and blew back at them and deflected their own. So violent was the wind that the Jews could not stand upon their parapets, having no firm foothold, nor could they see their attackers. Thus the Romans got up and surrounded them and killed some as they resisted and others as they were surrendering, and the memory of those who died in the first assault whetted their rage against them all. Surrounded on every side and despairing of escape, many threw their children, their wives and themselves down the precipices, into the valley beneath the citadel, which had been hollowed to a great depth. In the event, this made the rage of the Romans appeared milder than the frenzy of those who took their own lives, for the Romans killed only four thousand, while those who threw themselves down were numbered at over five thousand. Nobody escaped except two women, daughters of Philip who was himself the son of an eminent man called Jacimus, a general of king Agrippa's army. They escaped because when the city was taken they lay concealed from the rage of the Romans, for otherwise they spared not even the infants, of many of whom they flung down from the citadel. (Wars of the Jews 4, 70-83)
Name: Jairus/Jacimus (another example of a word corruption)
Verbatim: daughter, weeping, dying, concealed/hidden
Concept: two daughters are of the house of Jairus/Jacimus, facing up/pressing against, blood ran down/flow of blood, bleeding stops when killed, release of power/demonic storm
Typology: The Romans are killing the Jews whilst trying to ascend the citadel, and a flow of blood is running down the slopes, including from one of their daughters (subject to this suffering not just at age 12 – but throughout her life). The Jews being killed initially are those pressing against Titus, yet the daughter barely touches his cloak causing a violent demonic wind that, figuratively speaking, suddenly pushes the Romans up to the citadel to finish off the remainder of Jews. Once all are killed then the bleeding stops so to speak, including the first daughter who is then healed after coming out of hiding (the reason He says "Who touched me?"). A second daughter is thought to be dead; however, the child is not dead but asleep – “they escaped because when the city was taken they lay concealed from the rage of the Romans”.
Satire: The first daughter caused the “demonic wind” because, according to Leviticus (much Roman satire is based on the Jews' own texts!), she is said to be “unclean” and cannot make contact with anyone: others can press up to Titus and suffer individual deaths, but in exaggerating the uncleanliness of the Jews, the daughter (unclean her entire life!) barely touches his cloak and causes a “demonic wind” – enough to force Titus up towards the Citadel to kill the majority of remaining Jews, thereby completing the fall of Gamala. But the Romans’ rage is considered milder still, for many Jews threw themselves and their families down the precipices, into the valley beneath the citadel. The daughter’s faith in the Romans healed the uncleanliness that was affecting her and other children by finishing off the dying Jews who had caused so much blood.

“ ‘When a woman has her regular flow of blood, the impurity of her monthly period will last seven days, and anyone who touches her will be unclean till evening.“ ‘Anything she lies on during her period will be unclean, and anything she sits on will be unclean. Anyone who touches her bed will be unclean; they must wash their clothes and bathe with water, and they will be unclean till evening. Anyone who touches anything she sits on will be unclean; they must wash their clothes and bathe with water, and they will be unclean till evening. Whether it is the bed or anything she was sitting on, when anyone touches it, they will be unclean till evening. (Leviticus 15:19-23)

Next Parallel: Demons speak out through humane offering
 
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