Here comes the sun? and its cold? 4 min. youtube; The subject here comes the 'Grand Minimum'!

lorenhough

Well-Known Member

Suspicious0bservers Shared on Google+ · 19 hours ago
This Members-Only content from Suspicious0bservers.org has been shared on YouTube because it describes and frames what is probably the single most significant heliophysics discovery of the year; "or in your life''!

The subject of a coming grand minimum, despite some of the experts' concurrence and the data suggesting only one near-term outcome for the sun, has drawn controversy from many in the heliophysics community; I have fallen on the side of a coming grand minimum and am not shy about my praise for this mathematical model. I don't like most models; they tend not to match observational data - this one does


Video Articles: New Model Says Minimum is Coming: http://phys.org/news/2015-07-irregular-heartbeat-sun-driven-dynamo.html Solar N/S Divide Article: http://phys.org/news/2015-07-solar-magnetic-field-north-south.html Observing the Frontier Conference: https://www.eventjoy.com/e/suspicious0bservers www.Suspicious0bservers.org www.SpaceWeatherNews.com www.MagneticReversal.org www.ObservatoryProject.com www.EarthChangesMedia.com
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my friends this is very very important please look.

joe this for you my friend, and for those who love joe; and have ears to hear this; fuku shima is real so is the sun effects; let history and your own mind and god guide you. think for your self. you are not a school fish.

see ya in Fiji joe; dear brother

all are welcome. I will help any one who asks, who has good manners and tells the truth.

Loren Byron Hough
 

lorenhough

Well-Known Member


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_cycle

Solar minimum events and approximate dates
Event
Start End
Homeric minimum [9] 950BC 800BC
Oort minimum (see Medieval Warm Period) 1040 1080
Medieval maximum (see Medieval Warm Period) 1100 1250
Wolf minimum 1280 1350
Spörer Minimum 1450 1550
Maunder Minimum 1645 1715
Dalton Minimum 1790 1820
Modern Maximum 1900 present

See also
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_minimum

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_Warm_Period


A list of historical Grand minima of solar activity[10] includes also Grand minima ca. 690 AD, 360 BC, 770 BC, 1390 BC, 2860 BC, 3340 BC, 3500 BC, 3630 BC, 3940 BC, 4230 BC, 4330 BC, 5260 BC, 5460 BC, 5620 BC, 5710 BC, 5990 BC, 6220 BC, 6400 BC, 7040 BC, 7310 BC, 7520 BC, 8220 BC, 9170 BC.

See also





http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maunder_Minimum






https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_warming



for those you don't just think they know but for those who take the time to learn to think for them selves. beyond the school fool pool.
 
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lorenhough

Well-Known Member
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_warming



for those you don't just think they know but for those who take the time to learn to think for them selves. beyond the school fool pool.
The Maunder Minimum, also known as the "prolonged sunspot minimum", is the name used for the period starting in about 1645 and continuing to about 1715 when sunspots became exceedingly rare, as noted by solar observers of the time.

The term was introduced after John A. Eddy published a landmark 1976 paper in Science.[1] Astronomers before Eddy had also named the period after the solar astronomers Annie Maunder (1868-1947) and E. Walter Maunder (1851–1928) who studied how sunspot latitudes changed with time.[2] The period the husband and wife team examined included the second half of the 17th century. Two papers were published in Edward Maunder's name in 1890 and 1894, and he cited earlier papers written by Gustav Spörer.[3] Due to the social climate of the time, Annie's contribution was not publicly recognized.[4]

Spörer noted that during one 30-year period within the Maunder Minimum observations showed fewer than 50 sunspots, as opposed to a more typical 40,000–50,000 spots in modern times.[5]


Note that the term "Little Ice Age" applied to the Maunder minimum is something of a misnomer as it implies a period of unremitting cold (and on a global scale), which is not the case. For example, the coldest winter in the Central England Temperature record is 1683-4, but the winter just 2 years later (both in the middle of the Maunder minimum) was the fifth warmest in the whole 350-year CET record. Furthermore, summers during the Maunder minimum were not significantly different to those seen in subsequent years. The drop in global average temperatures in paleoclimate reconstructions at the start of the Little Ice Age was between about 1560 and 1600, whereas the Maunder minimum began almost 50 years later.


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Solar cycle 24

ISES Solar Cycle 24 Sunspot Number Progression

Sunspot Data
Start date
January 4, 2008
Cycle chronology
Previous cycle
Solar cycle 23 (2000-2008)

NASA Solar Cycle 24 Sunspot Number Prediction


Solar Cycle 24 is the 24th solar cycle since 1755, when extensive recording of solar sunspot activity began.[1][2] It is the current solar cycle, and began on January 4, 2008, but there was minimal activity until early 2010.[3][4] It is on track to be the Solar Cycle with the lowest recorded sunspot activity since accurate records began in 1750.

Contents
[hide]



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    Play media


    The coronal mass ejection starts at 2:36 UTC and ends at 3:56 UTC on August 1, 2010 in this animation on STEREO Ahead images.

  • SDO multi-wavelength image of the August 1, 2010 event.
Solar flare
According to the Solar Dynamics Observatory, these CMEs were probably connected to a C3.2-class solar flare that peaked on August 1 at 08:26 UT. The origin of this blast was sunspot 1092. Connection between both events was established despite the ~400,000 km distance between them.[26]

Aurorae observaons
In the early morning hours of August 4, 2010 aurorae occurred in the northern hemisphere that were visible at latitudes as far south as Michigan and Wisconsin in the United States, and Ontario, Canada near latitude 45° North. European observers reported sightings as far south as Denmark near latitude 56° North. The aurorae were reportedly green in color due to the interaction of the solar particles with oxygen atoms in the relatively denser atmosphere of southern latitudes.[27] This, however, was only the first wave of solar wind; the third and last was expected for the evening of August 5,[28] but missed Earth entirely. Geomagnetic storm reached a G2 (moderate) level in NOAA scale.

Solar radiation storm
Unrelated to the multiple coronal mass ejections, some days after, on August 14, a C4.4-class flare produced the first solar radiation storm of Solar Cycle 24. The proton storm event was minor, S1 level, and was easily absorbed by the ionosphere

 
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lorenhough

Well-Known Member
See also

The SDO captured an image of the event.
The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, an M7.9-class, peaking at 4:16 a.m. EDT on June 25, 2015.[76]




The Aug 9, 2011 X6.9-class flare, taken by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) in extreme UV light at 131 Angstroms.

The active region 1302, responsible for two X-class flares in Sep 22 and 24, 2011. Image taken that month by NASA's SDO
  • X6.9-class flare[edit]
    On August 9 at 0805 UT, sunspot 1263 produced a massive X6.9-class solar flare, the third X-flare of Solar Cycle 24 and the most powerful so far (as of May 2013). There was also a CME associated with this burst. Although the flare was not Earth-directed, radiation created waves of ionization in Earth's upper atmosphere, briefly disrupting communications at some VLF and HF radio frequencies. A R3-level (strong) radio blackout alert was issued. A proton event greater than 10 MeV (=million electron volts) ions and exceeding 10 pfu (=proton flux units) was also reported, so a S1-level solar radiation storm was also issued.[38]
Sorry, your browser either has JavaScript disabled or does not have any supported player.
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'>
Play media Enlil model for the March 2012 coronal mass ejection, plotted out to ten astronomical units (beyond the orbit of Saturn). The top view slices the data in the plane of the Earth's orbit and projects the planetary orbits onto that. The side view is a cross-section through the Sun-Earth line. The wedge-shape of the side view is because the Enlil model only extends above and below the solar equator by 60 degrees.
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Play media Short video of the eruption beginning on April 16th 2012. The video begins in 304 Angstrom extreme ultraviolet and ends with 171 Angstrom.
April[edit]
A prominence eruption producing a CME shot off the east limb (left side) of the Sun on April 16, 2012.[61] Such eruptions are often associated with solar flares, and in this case an M1.7 class (medium-sized) flare occurred at the same time, peaking at 1:45 PM EDT and 17.45 UTC.[61] The CME was not aimed toward Earth.[61] Nevertheless, this month was very quiet in comparison to the previous one, as only two M-class flares were recorded.

May[edit]
Solar activity increased again this month, with 12 M-class flares ejected, being the strongest the M5.7 flare produced by active region 1476 on May 10. This so-called "monster" sunspot complex, the largest active
August 31, 2012 CME: pictured here is a lighten blended version of the 304 and 171 angstrom
 

lorenhough

Well-Known Member
The Maunder Minimum, also known as the "prolonged sunspot minimum", is the name used for the period starting in about 1645 and continuing to about 1715 when sunspots became exceedingly rare, as noted by solar observers of the time.

Solar radiation storm
Unrelated to the multiple coronal mass ejections, some days after, on August 14, a C4.4-class flare produced the first solar radiation storm of Solar Cycle 24. The proton storm event was minor, S1 level, and was easily absorbed by the ionosphere

fuk u shima 3-11-11 times 500 if the big Carrington event or bigger hit to day! where are you and are you doing about it? dear school fish
 

lorenhough

Well-Known Member
fuk u shima 3-11-11 times 500 if the big Carrington event or bigger hit to day! where are you and are you doing about it? dear school fish

Galactic Flares - Milky Way Awakens | S0 News September 24, 2015
 

lorenhough

Well-Known Member
Here comes the sun? and its cold? 4 min. youtube; The subject here comes the 'Grand Minimum'! More proof
Discussion in 'Technology' started by lorenhough,

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