Answers water electricity

lorenhough

Well-Known Member
The electricity generator you can pedal: ‘Free Electric’ bike can create 24 hours of electricity with just an hour of exercise
  • 'Free Electric' bike uses human mechanical energy to produce electricity
  • Peddling on the bike for one hour will generate 24 hours of electricity
  • Distribution begins in India next month, with goal of 10,000 later this year
  • The bike will range from free to $250, depending on ability to pay for it
By CHEYENNE MACDONALD FOR DAILYMAIL.COM

PUBLISHED: 00:43 GMT, 25 February 2016 | UPDATED: 00:43 GMT, 25 February 2016

Millions of people around the world are without access to electricity at any given time – but the man behind 5-Hour Energy drinks claims to have found the answer.

The ‘Free Electric’ solution from Billions in Change uses a simple stationary bike to generate 24 hours of electricity, and it’s backed by Living Essentials CEO Manoj Bhargava.

The bike requires just one hour of pedalling to produce a whole day’s worth of electricity, and the CEO and philanthropist is calling it ‘the cheapest, most practical way’ to create electricity around the world.




The ‘Free Electric’ solution from Billions in Change uses a simple stationary bike to generate 24 hours of electricity. Homes in much of the world have electricity for just a few hours a day, if at all, but the Free Electric solution aims to change this

HOW IT WORKS
When a person peddles, the wheel on the bicycle will drive a flywheel, which turns a generator.

This will charge a battery, providing enough electricity for 24 hours after just an hour of peddling.

The mechanism is made with regular bike parts, so it can easily be fixed.

With no connection to ‘the grid,’ this bike can provide electricity anywhere, as long there’s someone there to peddle it.

The Free Electric solution is based on human mechanical energy, harnessed through a simple stationary bike.

In a video describing the concept, the bike powers a smartphone, a tablet, and a fan all at once while a man peddles nearby.

Homes in much of the world have electricity for just a few hours a day, if at all, but the Free Electric solution aims to change this.

Even highly developed areas sometimes face crisis when electricity becomes suddenly unavailable, during natural disasters or blackouts.

With no connection to ‘the grid,’ this bike can provide electricity anywhere, as long there’s someone there to peddle it.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3462885/The-electricity-generator-pedal-Free-Electric-bike-create-24-hours-electricity-just-hour-exercise.html#ixzz43OdRIYAo
 

lorenhough

Well-Known Member
By the third quarter of this year, the philanthropist aims to see 10,000 bikes in operation.

Depending on income levels, the price will vary dramatically – Bhargava says it will go from free to $250, and ‘fancier’ versions down the line could even climb to $1500 in wealthy locations.

Critics have argued that impoverished communities are more in need of grid-based power, rather than off-the-grid solutions, but Bhargava tells Fox that ‘Grid-based power isn’t a solution for people who are poor.’

By putting electricity in the hands of those who are without it, Bhargava says impoverished people will be able to elevate their situations.

‘The real thing is to get the poor out of poverty, and one of the basics is energy,’ Bhargava says in the video.

‘The poor half stay the poor half because they have no power, they have no energy. That’s one of the most fundamental things.’

I just wrote them to. Let me show them here.in Fiji .. LH

Billions in Change also has proposed solutions for drought, health, and energy limitations.
 

lorenhough

Well-Known Member
This is a quick update about our production plans for Free Electric. I’m sure you have many questions, and hopefully this will answer some of those.

As you know, the India pilot is currently underway, and will last for a couple of months. While that's happening, we're in the process of setting up three manufacturing plants: one in Singapore and two in India.

Those plants will build Free Electric production lines that are identical to the one we built at Stage 2 to make the bikes for the pilot. In fact, we used the pilot as a way to optimize the production line so that it could be replicated easily in other places.

Because the Singapore plant will probably be up and running first-likely in the next few months-the bikes coming out of Singapore will be shipped to India until the Indian facilities are ready. We're aiming for production in India to begin sometime this summer.

Once India's production lines are running, the Indian plants will supply India, and we'll send the bikes being produced in Singapore to other regions of Southeast Asia that have expressed interest. Eventually, we could set up production lines anywhere in the world where there's sufficient infrastructure and the right distribution networks.

We estimate the cost to produce and distribute a bike will be about 17,000 rupees, or $US 250. We’re not looking to make a profit, so that’s what we’ll sell them for as well, if not for less.







Finally, I want you to be among the first to see our new short video clip updating everyone on the Free Electric project. Please take a look. We'll be posting it to our social media pages tomorrow.

I'll be sure to keep you posted as we have more news to share.
 
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