Abiogenic petroleum? King hubbert; mat simmons; mike ruppert; who what where?

lorenhough

Well-Known Member
Author Jerome Corsi and researcher Michael Ruppert debated whether oil is a renewable source produced deep inside the Earth, or a finite ...

and ruppert lost the debated big time! see below;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abiogenic_petroleum_origin

Abiogenic petroleum wiki edited LH

Abiogenic petroleum origin
is a term used to describe a number of different theories which propose that fossil fuels are formed by inorganic means rather than by the decomposition of organisms. The two principal abiogenic petroleum theories, the deep gas theory of Thomas Gold and the deep abiotic petroleum theory, have been scientifically discredited and are obsolete.[1] Scientific opinion on the origin of fossil fuels is that almost all fossil fuels on earth are not abiogenic in origin. There are a few abiogenic petroleum theories which are still subject to ongoing research and which typically seek to explain the existence of smaller quantities of fossil fuels.
Some abiogenic theories have proposed that fossil fuels have originated from deep carbon deposits, present since the formation of the Earth.[2] Other hypotheses have suggested that hydrocarbons may have arrived on Earth from solid bodies such as comets and asteroids from the late formation of the solar system, carrying hydrocarbons with them.[3][4]
Some abiogenic hypotheses gained limited popularity among geologists over the past several centuries. Scientists in the former Soviet Union widely held that significant petroleum deposits could be attributed to abiogenic origin, though this view fell out of favor toward the end of the 20th century because they did not make useful predictions for the discovery of oil deposits.[1]

Earliest abiogenic theories in the 16th century, with considerable additional speculation regarding the origin of petroleum dating to the 18th and early part of the 19th century. At the time, the chemical nature of petroleum was not known.
An abiogenic hypothesis was first proposed by Georgius Agricola in the 16th century and various additional abiogenic hypotheses were proposed in the 19th century, most notably by Prussian geographer Alexander von Humboldt,[when?] the Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev[when?] and the French chemist Marcellin Berthelot.[when?] Abiogenic hypotheses were revived in the last half of the 20th century by Soviet scientists who had little influence outside the Soviet Union because most of their research was published in Russian. The hypothesis was re-defined and made popular in the West by Thomas Gold[when?] who published all his research in English.[1]
Abraham Gottlob Werner and the proponents of neptunism in the 18th century regarded basaltic sills as solidified oils or bitumen. While these notions proved unfounded, the basic idea of an association between petroleum and magmatism persisted. Alexander von Humboldt proposed an inorganic abiogenic hypothesis for petroleum formation after he observed petroleum springs in the Bay of Cumaux (Cumaná) on the northeast coast of Venezuela.[6] He is quoted as saying in 1804, "the petroleum is the product of a distillation from great depth and issues from the primitive rocks beneath which the forces of all volcanic action lie".[citation needed] Other prominent proponents of what would become the abiogenic hypothesis[clarification needed] included Mendeleev (1877)[7] and Berthelot (1827-1907).

1951, the Soviet geologist Nikolai Alexandrovitch Kudryavtsev proposed the modern abiotic hypothesis of petroleum.[8][9] On the basis of his analysis of the Athabasca Oil Sands in Alberta, Canada, he concluded that no "source rocks" could form the enormous volume of hydrocarbons, and therefore offered abiotic deep petroleum as the most plausible explanation. (Humic coals have since been proposed for the source rocks.[10]) Others who continued Kudryavtsev's work included Petr N. Kropotkin, Vladimir B. Porfir'ev, Emmanuil B. Chekaliuk, Vladilen A. Krayushkin, Georgi E. Boyko, Georgi I. Voitov, Grygori N. Dolenko, Iona V. Greenberg, Nikolai S. Beskrovny, and Victor F. Linetsky.
Astronomer Thomas Gold was the most[citation needed] prominent proponent of the abiogenic hypothesis in the West until his death in 2004.[1] More recently, Jack Kenney of Gas Resources Corporation has come to prominence.[11][12][13]
State of current research
Main article: Petroleum § Formation
The weight of evidence currently shows that petroleum is derived from ancient biomass.[14] However, it still has to be established conclusively, which means that abiogenic alternative theories of petroleum formation cannot be dismissed.[15] The initial[clarification needed] evidence was based on the isolation of molecules from petroleum that closely resemble known biomolecules.
 
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lorenhough

Well-Known Member
Hydrogen generation
Hydrogen gas and water have been found more than 6,000 metres (20,000 ft) deep in the upper crust in the Siljan Ring boreholes and the Kola Superdeep Borehole. Data from the western United States suggests that aquifers from near the surface may extend to depths of 10,000 metres (33,000 ft) to 20,000 metres (66,000 ft). Hydrogen gas can be created by water reacting with silicates, quartz, and feldspar at temperatures in the range of 25 °C (77 °F) to 270 °C (518 °F). These minerals are common in crustal rocks such as granite. Hydrogen may react with dissolved carbon compounds in water to form methane and higher carbon compounds.[28]
One reaction not involving silicates which can create hydrogen is:[citation needed]
Ferrous oxide + water → magnetite + hydrogen
3FeO + H2O → Fe3O4 + H2
The above reaction operates best at low pressures. At pressures greater than 5 gigapascals (49,000 atm) almost no hydrogen is created.[3]
Thomas Gold reported that hydrocarbons were found in the Siljan Ring borehole and in general increased with depth, although the venture was not a commercial success.[29]

who is ?M. King Hubbert - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Marion King Hubbert (October 5, 1903 – October 11, 1989) was a geoscientist who worked at the Shell research lab in Houston, Texas. He made several important contributions to geology, geophysics, and petroleum geology, most notably the Hubbert curve and Hubbert peak theory (a basic component of peak oil), with important political ramifications. He was often referred to as "M. King Hubbert" or "King Hubbert".

Hubbert was born in San Saba, Texas. He attended the University of Chicago, where he received his B.S. in 1926, his M.S. in 1928, and his Ph.D in 1937, studying geology, mathematics, and physics. He worked as an assistant geologist for the Amerada Petroleum Company for two years while pursuing his Ph.D., additionally teaching geophysics at Columbia University. He also served as a senior analyst at the Board of Economic Warfare. He joined the Shell Oil Company in 1943, retiring from that firm in 1964. After he retired from Shell, he became a senior research geophysicist for the United States Geological Survey until his retirement in 1976. He also held positions as a professor of geology and geophysics at Stanford University from 1963 to 1968, and as a professor at UC Berkeley from 1973 to 1976.

Hubbert was also an avid technocrat. The technocrats proposed replacing politicians and businesspeople with scientists and engineers who had the technical expertise to manage the economy. for the big by the bigs.

He co-founded Technocracy Incorporated with Howard Scott. Hubbert wrote a study course[2] that was published without authorship called Technocracy Study Course,[3] the precedent document of that group which advocates a non-market economics form of energy accounting,[4] in contrast to the current Price System method.[5] Hubbert was a member of the Board of Governors, and served as Secretary of education to that organization.


A bell-shaped production curve, as originally suggested by M. King Hubbert in 1956
Hubbert made several contributions to geophysics, including a mathematical demonstration that rock in the Earth's crust, because it is under immense pressure in large areas, should exhibit plasticity, similar to clay. This demonstration explained the observed results that the Earth's crust deforms over time. He also studied the flow of underground fluids.

Hubbert is most well known for his studies on the size of oil fields and natural gas reserves, and the limits these impose on rates of oil and gas production. He predicted that, for any given geographical area, from an individual oil field to the planet as a whole, the rate of petroleum production of the reserve over time would resemble a bell curve. Based on his theory, he presented a paper to the 1956 meeting of the American Petroleum Institute in San Antonio, Texas, which predicted that overall petroleum production would peak in the United States between 1965, which he considered most likely, and 1970, which he considered an upper-bound case.[7] At first his prediction received much criticism, for the most part because many other predictions of oil capacity had been made over the preceding half century, but these had usually been based on the reserves-to-production ratio, had not taken into account future discoveries, and had proven false.[8]
 
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lorenhough

Well-Known Member
Hubbert became famous when this prediction proved correct in 1970.
Between October 17, 1973, and March 1974, the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC) ceased shipments of petroleum to the United States, because of the U.S. giving relief to Israel during the Israeli–Arab war, thus causing what has been called the 1973 energy crisis.
In 1974, Hubbert projected that global oil production would peak in 1995 "if current trends continue".[9] Various subsequent predictions have been made by others as trends have fluctuated in the intervening years. Hubbert's theory, and its implications for the world economy, remain the only factual proof about the case.[clarification needed][citation needed]

Hubbert believed that solar power would be a practical renewable energy replacement for fossil fuels, and that nuclear energy in breeder reactors would be able to sustain us for centuries.[7] He also states that "provided world population can somehow be brought under control, we may at last have found an energy supply (uranium) adequate for our needs for at least the next few centuries of the 'foreseeable future.'"[10]

who is ?
Matthew Simmons - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Matthew Roy Simmons (April 7, 1943[4] – August 8, 2010) was founder and chairman emeritus of Simmons & Company International, and was a prominent figure in the field of peak oil. Simmons was motivated by the 1973 energy crisis to create an investment banking firm catering to oil companies. He served as an energy adviser to U.S. President George W. Bush and was a member of the National Petroleum Council and the Council on Foreign Relations.
Simmons, who lived in Houston, Texas, died at his vacation home in North Haven, Maine, on August 8, 2010, at the age of 67. The cause of death was ruled "accidental drowning with heart disease a contributing factor".
Simmons was the author of the book Twilight in the Desert, published in 2005. His examination of oil reserve decline rates helped raise awareness of the unreliability of Middle East oil reserves. He gave numerous presentations on peak oil and water shortages.
Simmons believed that the Club of Rome predictions are more accurate than usually acknowledged.
Simmons was the founder of the Ocean Energy Institute in Maine. His vision was to make Maine a leader in energy from offshore wind and ocean forces.
Saudi Arabian oil reserves who told him what they had??
In his book, Simmons argues that production from Saudi Arabia and especially from Ghawar—the world's largest oil field—will peak in the near future, if it has not done so already. Simmons bases his case on hundreds of internal documents from Saudi Aramco, professional journals and other authoritative sources.
 

lorenhough

Well-Known Member
]who is ??
Michael Ruppert - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Ruppert
Michael
C. Ruppert (February 3, 1951 – April 13, 2014) was an American author, a former Los Angeles Police Department officer, investigative journalist, political ...

Ruppert was the author of Crossing The Rubicon: The Decline of the American Empire at the End of the Age of Oil. He was the subject of the 2009 documentary film Collapse, which was based on his book A Presidential Energy Policy and received the New York Times' "critics pick".[2][4][5] In 2014, VICE featured Ruppert in a 6-part series titled Apocalypse, Man.[15]
Ruppert is the author of Crossing The Rubicon: The Decline of the American Empire at the End of the Age of Oil,[20] published in September 2004. Crossing The Rubicon claims that Vice President Dick Cheney, the US government, and Wall Street had a well-developed awareness of and colluded with the perpetrators of 9/11.

Numerous documentary films have featured Ruppert, including the The 911 Report You Never Saw - The Great Conspiracy, Peak Oil - Imposed by Nature,[21] Zeitgeist: Moving Forward, The End of Suburbia, American Drug War: The Last White Hope, Collapse and Apocalypse, Man.[15]

Ruppert correctly predicted the financial crisis in the US five years before it happened.[4][22]
He has been termed a "conspiracy theorist",[3][5][6][7][8][23][24] to which he has said he "deals with "conspiracy fact" rather than theory."[25] His book Crossing the Rubicon was a "favorite among conspiracy theorists", according to the The Wall Street Journal. After writing it, and subsequently moving on to peak oil, he said "I walked away from 9/11 five years ago," he says. "I have nothing to do with the 9/11 truth movement."[26]

I met him 2 times once with carol b and she publicly put him down at his opening in sf of collapse. but she was friendly after the show. LH

The Oil Debate - Shows - Coast to Coast AM
http://www.coasttocoastam.com/shows/2006/01/12

and ruppert lost the debated big time!

Date: Thursday - January 12, 2006
Host: George Noory
Guests: Jerome Corsi, Michael Ruppert
Author Jerome Corsi and researcher Michael Ruppert debated whether oil is a renewable source produced deep inside the Earth, or a finite resource which will become more scarce within our lifetime.

Corsi's position: Oil is not "fossil fuel" but rather an "abiotic" substance that is naturally replenished on a constant basis. The so-called scarcity is a tact taken by the oil companies in order to increase their profits. Various surveys going back to the early 1900's have all claimed that we were going to run out of oil, but we now have a greater supply than we ever had. Oil companies should lose their tax incentives if they don't increase their reserves.

Ruppert's position: The world is behaving as if the Peak Oil theory were true, and our supplies will begin to dwindle from the amount they are now at. The notion of replenishing abiotic oil is not supported in scientific literature. Further, specific abiotic sites such as Dneiper-Donets basin and the Eugene Island Lot have turned out to be a bust or in decline in terms of supplying oil. .

A Fast Blast poll found 62% siding with Corsi and 38% with Ruppert.

Jerome Robert Corsi (born August 31, 1946) is an American author, political commentator and conspiracy theorist[1][2] best known for his two New York Times bestselling books: The Obama Nation and Unfit for Command (with co-author John O'Neill). Both books, the former written in 2008 and the latter in 2004, attacked Democratic presidential candidates and were criticized for including numerous inaccuracies.

In other books and columns for conservative websites such as WorldNetDaily and Human Events, Corsi has discussed topics that are considered conspiracy theories, such as the alleged plans for a North American Government, the theory that President Barack Obama is not an American citizen;[6] criticism of the United States government for allegedly covering up information about the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001,[7] promoting the Abiogenic hypothesis of the origin of oil (arguing that oil is produced from chemical reactions in the Earth, in contrast to the general consensus of the scientific community that oil is produced from organic materials, such as zooplankton and algae), and alleged United States support of Iran in its attempts to develop nuclear weapons.
 
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Jerry Russell

Administrator
Staff member
It's possible Corsi and Ruppert are both right. The sources of oil might be abiotic and renewable, and yet the renewal rate might be very slow compared to what civilization would need. It's true that very early projections of oil scarcity were incorrect, but the Hubbert curve has been pretty accurate for conventional oil production. The oil companies have been working harder and harder to find new sources of oil. Fracking for shale oil has horrendous environmental consequences.

While I would be the first to admit that the oil companies are not trustworthy sources for reserve estimates, their behavior does indicate they're experiencing some problems.

Natural gas might be a different story: if there are huge reserves of hydrocarbons in the mantle of earth, it seems much more likely that they would be stable in the form of methane rather than petroleum. Look at the deposits of carbonate rocks! I suggest that since the beginning of the earth, carbon mostly as methane must have been emitted from volcanos and fissures, dissolved in the ocean, and precipitated out as rock.
 

lorenhough

Well-Known Member
It's possible Corsi and Ruppert are both right. The sources of oil might be abiotic and renewable, and yet the renewal rate might be very slow compared to what civilization would need. It's true that very early projections of oil scarcity were incorrect, but the Hubbert curve has been pretty accurate for conventional oil production. The oil companies have been working harder and harder to find new sources of oil. Fracking for shale oil has horrendous environmental consequences.

While I would be the first to admit that the oil companies are not trustworthy sources for reserve estimates, their behavior does indicate they're experiencing some problems.

Natural gas might be a different story: if there are huge reserves of hydrocarbons in the mantle of earth, it seems much more likely that they would be stable in the form of methane rather than petroleum. Look at the deposits of carbonate rocks! I suggest that since the beginning of the earth, carbon mostly as methane must have been emitted from volcanos and fissures, dissolved in the ocean, and precipitated out as rock.
hi Jerry & joe & crew

jerry said; 'The oil companies have been working harder and harder to find new sources of oil. Fracking for shale oil has horrendous environmental consequences.

While I would be the first to admit that the oil companies are not trustworthy sources for reserve estimates, their behavior does indicate they're"it it getting harder to find.

I say really? this is what mike r would say.

I say the new technology is making it easer! to find and to get out of the earth, they can see deep in to the earth with sat. from space!

why does fracking show there is less oil? it just shows me they are poisoning the well ! like corexit in the bp gulf etc etc etc there behavior is a show like foxes in chicken feathers clothing! they say we have to poising the earth to save us from yourselves ? is that the truth? is this because there is to many people or because a few think there is to many and are doing something about it sorry to say. with plausible deniability

like you said there is plenty of gas. I say no need for nuke plants or Frankenstein fracking.

Loren
 
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Jerry Russell

Administrator
Staff member
Hi Loren,

I agree that the new technology should make it easier to find oil and produce it. But in spite of that, they're going to greater and greater lengths, expending increasingly huge amounts of money, and coming up with the same or smaller amounts of product. Yes, it's what Ruppert would say, and sometimes even Ruppert can be right?

I said that there "might" be more gas. I'm not sure.

"my chicken's are not chicken of the chicken fox fooling." This seems to be saying that the fox is eating my chickens, or something?

Again, I'd like to remind that we're all on a search for truth here; so let's try to be kind to each other?
 

lorenhough

Well-Known Member
hi Jerry & joe & crew

jerry said; 'The oil companies have been working harder and harder to find new sources of oil. Fracking for shale oil has horrendous environmental consequences.

While I would be the first to admit that the oil companies are not trustworthy sources for reserve estimates, their behavior does indicate they're"it it getting harder to find.

I say really? this is what mike r would say.

I say the new technology is making it easer! to find and to get out of the earth, they can see deep in to the earth with sat. from space!

why does fracking show there is less oil? it just shows me they are poisoning the well ! like corexit in the bp gulf etc etc etc there behavior is a show like foxes in chicken feathers clothing! they say we have to poising the earth to save us from yourselves ? is that the truth? is this because there is to many people or because a few think there is to many and are doing something about it sorry to say. with plausible deniability

like you said there is plenty of gas. I say no need for nuke plants or Frankenstein fracking.

Loren
RBN RADIO SHOW ARCHIVE
RBN Gnostic Media Radio 065 – Greg – Oil vs. Alternative Fuels – 9/25/2015
September 25, 2015
Why oil is better than electric battery, it's a natural product of the earth decomposes naturally with bacteria. The problem with BP oil spill was not the oil but the corexet dispersant that was deadly and worse than the oil. Oil leaks out of the ground every day normally in the golf. The earth regenerates oil in it floats to the top as the earth spins it comes from deep below the earth thousands of feet discovered by the deepest oil wells in Russia cannot come from fossil fuels . Oil wells all over the United States that were pump dry and capped rude later found to be full of oil again. The big boys want you to pay high prices for oil want to take oil from you and let you freeze and walk no more personal vehicles for you. No more wood-burning stove for you. There are Diesel engines in Europe that get hundreds of miles per gallon that are keep off the market. The major explosion in China destroy new 10,000 high efficient diesel cars. Here Jan And Greg here with open mind then think for your self. Lh


Greg joins me to discuss oil, nuclear energy, alternative fuels, "peak oil," etc. This is a very enlightening conversation.

Audio Player


00:20:54
01:35:55

Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 1:35:55 — 65.9MB) | Embed

http://www.gnosticmedia.com/rbn-gnostic-media-radio-065-greg-oil-vs-alternative-fuels-9252015/
 

lorenhough

Well-Known Member
Author Jerome Corsi and researcher Michael Ruppert debated whether oil is a renewable source produced deep inside the Earth, or a finite ...

and ruppert lost the debated big time! see below;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abiogenic_petroleum_origin

Abiogenic petroleum wiki edited LH

Abiogenic petroleum origin
is a term used to describe a number of different theories which propose that fossil fuels are formed by inorganic means rather than by the decomposition of organisms. The two principal abiogenic petroleum theories, the deep gas theory of Thomas Gold and the deep abiotic petroleum theory, have been scientifically discredited and are obsolete.[1] Scientific opinion on the origin of fossil fuels is that almost all fossil fuels on earth are not abiogenic in origin. There are a few abiogenic petroleum theories which are still subject to ongoing research and which typically seek to explain the existence of smaller quantities of fossil fuels.
Some abiogenic theories have proposed that fossil fuels have originated from deep carbon deposits, present since the formation of the Earth.[2] Other hypotheses have suggested that hydrocarbons may have arrived on Earth from solid bodies such as comets and asteroids from the late formation of the solar system, carrying hydrocarbons with them.[3][4]
Some abiogenic hypotheses gained limited popularity among geologists over the past several centuries. Scientists in the former Soviet Union widely held that significant petroleum deposits could be attributed to abiogenic origin, though this view fell out of favor toward the end of the 20th century because they did not make useful predictions for the discovery of oil deposits.[1]

Earliest abiogenic theories in the 16th century, with considerable additional speculation regarding the origin of petroleum dating to the 18th and early part of the 19th century. At the time, the chemical nature of petroleum was not known.
An abiogenic hypothesis was first proposed by Georgius Agricola in the 16th century and various additional abiogenic hypotheses were proposed in the 19th century, most notably by Prussian geographer Alexander von Humboldt,[when?] the Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev[when?] and the French chemist Marcellin Berthelot.[when?] Abiogenic hypotheses were revived in the last half of the 20th century by Soviet scientists who had little influence outside the Soviet Union because most of their research was published in Russian. The hypothesis was re-defined and made popular in the West by Thomas Gold[when?] who published all his research in English.[1]
Abraham Gottlob Werner and the proponents of neptunism in the 18th century regarded basaltic sills as solidified oils or bitumen. While these notions proved unfounded, the basic idea of an association between petroleum and magmatism persisted. Alexander von Humboldt proposed an inorganic abiogenic hypothesis for petroleum formation after he observed petroleum springs in the Bay of Cumaux (Cumaná) on the northeast coast of Venezuela.[6] He is quoted as saying in 1804, "the petroleum is the product of a distillation from great depth and issues from the primitive rocks beneath which the forces of all volcanic action lie".[citation needed] Other prominent proponents of what would become the abiogenic hypothesis[clarification needed] included Mendeleev (1877)[7] and Berthelot (1827-1907).

1951, the Soviet geologist Nikolai Alexandrovitch Kudryavtsev proposed the modern abiotic hypothesis of petroleum.[8][9] On the basis of his analysis of the Athabasca Oil Sands in Alberta, Canada, he concluded that no "source rocks" could form the enormous volume of hydrocarbons, and therefore offered abiotic deep petroleum as the most plausible explanation. (Humic coals have since been proposed for the source rocks.[10]) Others who continued Kudryavtsev's work included Petr N. Kropotkin, Vladimir B. Porfir'ev, Emmanuil B. Chekaliuk, Vladilen A. Krayushkin, Georgi E. Boyko, Georgi I. Voitov, Grygori N. Dolenko, Iona V. Greenberg, Nikolai S. Beskrovny, and Victor F. Linetsky.
Astronomer Thomas Gold was the most[citation needed] prominent proponent of the abiogenic hypothesis in the West until his death in 2004.[1] More recently, Jack Kenney of Gas Resources Corporation has come to prominence.[11][12][13]
State of current research
Main article: Petroleum § Formation
The weight of evidence currently shows that petroleum is derived from ancient biomass.[14] However, it still has to be established conclusively, which means that abiogenic alternative theories of petroleum formation cannot be dismissed.[15] The initial[clarification needed] evidence was based on the isolation of molecules from petroleum that closely resemble known biomolecules.
 

lorenhough

Well-Known Member

Episode 241 is a very important discussion regarding oil and so-called “fossil fuels” and “peak oil”, with Greg Quinones, titled: “Abiogenic Petroleum: Peak Oil and “Fossil Fuels” – Debunked”.
This episode is being released for Thursday, December 03, 2015, and was recorded November 22.

Greg Quinones is a business consultant, writer, public speaker, trainer and teacher.

Greg is Founder and Managing Executive Partner of ZEN Enhanced Oil Recovery (ZENEOR) a Texas based privately held limited liability company.

ZENEOR specializes in “out-of-the-box” thinking in oil production and process. Through extensive knowledge of the oil industry, they bring new innovations and technologies to market in order to help practical minded operators lower costs, improve efficiency and reduce environmental risks.

The Company’s mission is to help achieve higher revenues for industry investors and higher netbacks for producers, land owners, royalty owners and working interest owners.

In the past Greg has served as a leadership/sales trainer and marketing associate in the investment banking and venture capital industries for various private firms in New York City.

He began his career in investment banking by serving as an apprentice and marketing associate where he established relationships with suppliers, end-buyers and investors of various commodites such as food, fuel and oil, and more.

Greg's website:
www.zeneor.com

 
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