40 years of coal ? oy a cat can be alive and dead at the same time? ok?

lorenhough

Well-Known Member
  • podcast #2 it was said some say we have 40 years of coal left;
  • Coal News - Coal's Foremost Publication Serving the Entire ...
    www.coalnews.net/facts.php
    Coal is available as there is enough to last over 250 years. ... foot wide rooms are driven in the coalbed with pillars or columns of coal left standing to help ...
 

Jerry Russell

Administrator
Staff member
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peak_coal

Wikipedia cites many divergent estimates of peak coal; some claim it's already happened. The US data show: (quote)

High-BTU anthracite coal peaked in 1914;[5] and declined from 44 million tons in 1950 to 1.6 million tons in 2007. Bituminous coal extraction has also been declining since 1990. The gap has been taken up by large increases in subbituminous coal extraction.[14]

In other words, the highest quality resources (low-hanging fruit) have long since been depleted, and we are mining more and more tonnage in return for less and less output.

Even supposing we take USGS figures at face value, it does not mean "Peak Coal is a fallacy". If it takes 250 years to consume the long tail of the resource, then peak production must happen much sooner. In terms of deep time, 250 years is a blink of an eye.
 

lorenhough

Well-Known Member
  • jerry podcast #2 33 min in the old cat trick tricked you
what is real ? 5 senses that is real is real and that's the truth.

the pie piper walrus would say sing with me! goo goo nothing is real and nothing is truth. o ya !

contradictions are contradictions always! so cat in the hat can not be dead and alive at the same time; well unless you walk on water and can you heal my right hand? and know how by the math how many angles can sit on a pin.

cat trick tricked; you will like the cat story at the beginning of this(3m-8m) Sample from David Harriman’s Philosophic Corruption of Physics Lecture

David talks later about the cat in the box or hat trick. don't let the cat out. or is it a pig in a poke.
just because the they say they the numbers say so does not make it true.
.http://peacerevolution.podomatic.com/entry/2012-08-12T08_45_48-07_00

Reference) The Philosophic Corruption of Physics supplement pdf

http://postflaviana.org/community/index.php?threads/philosophic-corruption-of-physics-and-the-logical-leap.13/

Book) David Harriman’s “Falling Apple” Institute (www.FallingApple.org)

jones was working with the big boys with the big colliders a insider he kills the pons skime [the horse that got out of the barn] and jones works goes no were with his work publicly \.

is jones to be trusted on the radiation level in the dust and why is he the one to lead the way on that and why would he think that a few samples would be the whole picture from a mountain of rubble. seem like a cover LH
 
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Jerry Russell

Administrator
Staff member
True, the cat is not both alive and dead at the same time. But, mathematics of quantum physics describe superposed states. Particles are also waves, as shown by diffraction experiments; if not a contradiction, certainly something that's hard to wrap your head around.
 

lorenhough

Well-Known Member
s
True, the cat is not both alive and dead at the same time. But, mathematics of quantum physics describe superposed states. Particles are also waves, as shown by diffraction experiments; if not a contradiction, certainly something that's hard to wrap your head around.
jerry said;

But, mathematics a language] of quantum physics describe superposed states.

wow I just did the mathematics and there is 1 angel dancing on the head of a pin. trust me? I know because; like Jerry said 'if not a contradiction, certainly something that's hard to wrap your head around'. [/QUOTE]

The Cat in the Hat (character) - Dr. Seuss Wiki stuff is to make u not be able to think; the cat box stinks;

wrap your head around this? kids ...Geisel with a list of 348 words that every six year old should know, and insisted that the book's vocabulary be limited to 225 words. Nine months later Dr. Seuss finished The Cat in the Hat, which used 223 words that appeared on the list plus 13 words that did not. this cat in the box cant read think or talk very well can he? [we think in words the more you know!! LH]

Theodor Geisel created The Cat in the Hat in response to the May 24, 1954, Life magazine article by John Hersey, titled "Why Do Students Bog Down on First R? A Local Committee Sheds Light on a National Problem: Reading.” In the article, Hersey was critical of school primers:
In the classroom boys and girls are confronted with six books that have insipid illustrations depicting the slicked-up lives of other children. Primers feature abnormally courteous, unnaturally clean boys and girls.

In bookstores, anyone can buy brighter, livelier books featuring strange and wonderful animals and children who behave naturally, i.e., sometimes misbehave. Given incentive from school boards, publishers could do as well with primers.

Hersey’s arguments were enumerated over ten pages of Life magazine. After detailing many issues contributing to the dilemma connected with student reading levels, Hersey asked toward the end of the article:

Why should school primers not have pictures that widen rather than narrow the associative richness the children give to the words they illustrate? Drawings like those of the wonderfully imaginative geniuses among children’s illustrators, Tenniel, Howard Pyle, "Seuss", and Walt Disney?

Ted Geisel's friend William Ellsworth Spaulding, who was then the director of Houghton Mifflin's education division, invited Geisel to dinner in Boston and "proposed” that Ted write and illustrate such a book for six- and seven-year olds who had already mastered the basic mechanics of reading. “Write me a story that first-graders can't put down!" he challenged. Spaulding supplied Geisel with a list of 348 words that every six year old should know, and insisted that the book's vocabulary be limited to 225 words.

Nine months later Dr. Seuss finished The Cat in the Hat, which used 223 words that appeared on the list plus 13 words that did not. Because Geisel was under contract with Random House, Houghton Mifflin retained the school rights to The Cat in the Hat and Random House retained the rights to trade sales.

In an interview he gave in Arizona magazine in June 1981, Dr. Seuss claimed the book took nine months to complete due to the difficulty in writing a book from the 223 selected words.

He added that the title for the book came from his desire to have the title rhyme and the first two suitable rhyming words that he could find from the list were "cat" and "hat".

Dr. Seuss also regretted the association of his book and the "look say" reading method adopted during the Dewey revolt in the 1920s. He expressed the opinion that "Killing phonics was one of the greatest causes of illiteracy in the country."



LH
 
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lorenhough

Well-Known Member
True, the cat is not both alive and dead at the same time. But, mathematics of quantum physics describe superposed states. Particles are also waves, as shown by diffraction experiments; if not a contradiction, certainly something that's hard to wrap your head around.
How many angels can sit on the head of a pin?"
or should I say cats?

The need for rationality as complementary to faith was raised as an important point for Catholic theology at the Council of Trent.[2] The question has also been linked to the fall of Constantinople, with the imagery of scholars debating about minutiae while the Turkish besieged the city.[3][4] In modern usage, it therefore has been used as a metaphor for wasting time debating topics of no practical value, or questions whose answers hold no intellectual consequence, while more urgent concerns pile up.[5][6]


The fact that certain renowned medieval scholars considered similar questions is clear; Aquinas's Summa Theologica, written c. 1270, includes discussion of several questions regarding angels such as, "Can several angels be in the same place?"[7] However the idea that such questions had a prominent place in medieval scholarship has been debated, and it has not been proved that this particular question was ever disputed.[8] One theory is that it is an early modern fabrication,[a] as used to discredit scholastic philosophy at a time when it still played a significant role in university education. James Franklin has raised the scholarly issue, and mentions that there is a 17th-century reference in William Chillingworth's Religion of Protestants (1637),[9] where he accuses unnamed scholastics of debating "Whether a Million of Angels may not fit upon a needle's point?" This is earlier than a reference in the 1678 The True Intellectual System Of The Universe by Ralph Cudworth. HS Lang, author of Aristotle's Physics and its Medieval Varieties (1992), says (p. 284):
"The question of how many angels can dance on the point of a needle, or the head of a pin, is often attributed to 'late medieval writers'... In point of fact, the question has never been found in this form".
The early modern version in English (usually a needle, rather than a pin) dates back at least to Richard Baxter. In his 1667 tract The Reasons of the Christian Religion, Baxter reviews opinions on the materiality of angels from ancient times, concluding:

And Schibler with others, maketh the difference of extension to be this, that Angels can contract their whole substance into one part of space, and therefore have not partes extra partes. Whereupon it is that the Schoolmen have questioned how many Angels may fit upon the point of a Needle?".

— Richard Baxter[10]
Philosopher George MacDonald Ross[11] has identified a close parallel in a 14th-century mystical text, the Swester Katrei. Other possibilities are that it is a surviving parody or self-parody, or a training topic in debating.

In Spanish, the conundrum of useless scholarly debates is linked to a similar question of whether angels have sex or are genderless.[4]
 
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