Evidence of Julius Caesar's Invasion of Britian Found

Discussion in 'History' started by Richard Stanley, Nov 29, 2017.

  1. Richard Stanley

    Richard Stanley Administrator

    I have excerpted the following because it discusses alliance treaties between JC and the elites of Britain. In addition to treaties, these would likely have included alliance marriages as well, as this practice was typical for the Romans and other expansionist empires. Both the treaties and marriages would indeed help provide for a long lasting affinity for Rome, even lasting beyond the time, centuries later, when the Romans departed.

    Such marriages were explicitly mentioned in works such as JC's Conquest of Gaul but, for some reason not so for his Britain experience.

    In any case, before the Roman departure, Constantine's father ruled the western quarter of the Roman empire from York.

    ...
    The new evidence is also challenging the long held belief that the invasion was a failure because Caesar returned to France, without completing the job.

    Professor Colin Haselgrove, the principal investigator for the project from the University of Leicester, explained: “It seems likely that the treaties set up by Caesar formed the basis for alliances between Rome and British royal families.

    “This eventually resulted in the leading rulers of south-east England becoming client kings of Rome. Almost 100 years after Caesar, in AD 43 the emperor Claudius invaded Britain.

    "The conquest of south-east England seems to have been rapid, probably because the kings in this region were already allied to Rome.

    “This was the beginning of the permanent Roman occupation of Britain, which included Wales and some of Scotland, and lasted for almost 400 years, suggesting that Claudius later exploited Caesar's legacy.” ...

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/...rst-evidence-julius-caesars-invasion-britain/

    Comporting with possible longer lasting Roman affinities in Britain, Flavio Barbiero, in his Secret Society of Moses, has posited that the entire Arthurian tableau is about such Roman legacy, only that the narrative as we know it today has been 'romantically' tweaked for whatever reason. I say it's for purposely obscuring such origins.
     

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